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      Impotence and Its Medical and Psychosocial Correlates: Results of the Massachusetts Male Aging Study

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      The Journal of Urology

      Elsevier BV

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          Impaired neurogenic and endothelium-mediated relaxation of penile smooth muscle from diabetic men with impotence.

          Relaxation of the smooth muscle of the corpora cavernosa of the penis is necessary for penile erection. To determine the relation of impaired relaxation to impotence in diabetic patients, we performed an in vitro examination of corpus cavernosum tissue obtained at the time of implantation of a penile prosthesis in 21 diabetic and 42 nondiabetic men with impotence. Contraction was induced in isolated strips of corporal smooth muscle by norepinephrine; then relaxation was assessed with electrical stimulation of autonomic nerves and with the administration of three agents: acetylcholine, which is known to be mediated by endothelium-derived relaxing factor; papaverine; and sodium nitroprusside. The latter two act directly on smooth muscle (i.e., they are endothelium-independent). Autonomically mediated relaxation with electrical stimulation was less pronounced in the smooth muscle from diabetic men (n = 18) than in the smooth muscle from nondiabetic men (n = 24; P = 0.001). The degree of impairment increased with the duration of diabetes (r = 0.61, P = 0.007). Endothelium-dependent relaxation was also impaired, as evidenced by a lower degree of muscle relaxation after the administration of acetylcholine in the tissue from diabetic men (n = 16) than in that from nondiabetic men (n = 22; P = 0.001). The adverse effects of diabetes persisted after we controlled for smoking and hypertension. Endothelium-independent relaxation after the administration of nitroprusside and papaverine was similar in tissue from the diabetic and nondiabetic men. We conclude that diabetic men with impotence have impairment in both the autonomic and the endothelium-dependent mechanisms that mediate the relaxation of the smooth muscle of the corpora cavernosa. These findings may provide a rationale for the treatment of diabetic men with impotence by intracavernosal injection of vasodilators to induce endothelium-independent relaxation of the smooth muscle.
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            A prospective study of dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate, mortality, and cardiovascular disease.

            It has been postulated that dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and its sulfate ester, dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEAS), the major secretory products of the human adrenal gland, may be discriminators of life expectancy and aging. We examined the relation of base-line circulating DHEAS levels to subsequent 12-year mortality from any cause, from cardiovascular disease, and from ischemic heart disease in a population-based cohort of 242 men aged 50 to 79 years at the start of the study. Mean DHEAS levels decreased with age and were also significantly lower in men with a history of heart disease than in those without such a history. In men with no history of heart disease at base line, the age-adjusted relative risk associated with a DHEAS level below 140 micrograms per deciliter was 1.5 (P not significant) for death from any causes, 3.3 (P less than 0.05) for death from cardiovascular disease, and 3.2 (P less than 0.05) for death from ischemic heart disease. In multivariate analyses, an increase in DHEAS level of 100 micrograms per deciliter was associated with a 36 percent reduction in mortality from any causes (P less than 0.05) and a 48 percent reduction in mortality from cardiovascular disease (P less than 0.05), after adjustment for age, systolic blood pressure, serum cholesterol level, obesity, fasting plasma glucose level, cigarette smoking status, and personal history of heart disease. Our conclusions are limited by the single determination of DHEAS levels, but the data suggest that the DHEAS concentration is independently and inversely related to death from any cause and death from cardiovascular disease in men over age 50.
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              The prevalence of diabetic impotence.

              In a survey of 541 diabetic males, aged 20-59 years, 190 (35%) had erectile impotence. Using linear logistic regression models for analysis the five most significant associations with impotence were age (p < 0.001), treatment with either insulin or oral hypoglycaemic agents (p < 0.001), retinopathy (p < 0.001), symptomatic peripheral neuropathy (p < 0.001) and symptomatic autonomic neuropathy (p < 0.005). The greatest correlations were found in patients with severe microangiopathy, as demonstrated by proliferative retinopathy and symptomatic autonomic neuropathy. In addition the duration of diabetes and the presence of ischaemic heart disease, nephropathy and poor diabetic control may also be associated with diabetic impotence. It is concluded that diabetic impotence is still a common problem and may have a multifactorial aetiology.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                The Journal of Urology
                The Journal of Urology
                Elsevier BV
                00225347
                January 1994
                January 1994
                : 151
                : 1
                : 54-61
                Article
                10.1016/S0022-5347(17)34871-1
                © 1994

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