10
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: not found
      • Article: not found

      Coordinated species importation policies are needed to reduce serious invasions globally: The case of alien bumblebees in South America

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisher
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 31

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: not found
          • Article: not found

          Effects of Introduced Bees on Native Ecosystems

           Dave Goulson (2003)
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: not found

            The invasion of southern South America by imported bumblebees and associated parasites.

            The Palaearctic Bombus ruderatus (in 1982/1983) and Bombus terrestris (1998) have both been introduced into South America (Chile) for pollination purposes. We here report on the results of sampling campaigns in 2004, and 2010-2012 showing that both species have established and massively expanded their range. Bombus terrestris, in particular, has spread by some 200 km year(-1) and had reached the Atlantic coast in Argentina by the end of 2011. Both species, and especially B. terrestris, are infected by protozoan parasites that seem to spread along with the imported hosts and spillover to native species. Genetic analyses by polymorphic microsatellite loci suggest that the host population of B. terrestris is genetically diverse, as expected from a large invading founder population, and structured through isolation by distance. Genetically, the populations of the trypanosomatid parasite, Crithidia bombi, sampled in 2004 are less diverse, and distinct from the ones sampled later. Current C. bombi populations are highly heterozygous and also structured through isolation by distance correlating with the genetic distances of B. terrestris, suggesting the latter's expansion to be a main structuring factor for the parasite. Remarkably, wherever B. terrestris spreads, the native Bombus dahlbomii disappears although the reasons remain unclear. Our ecological and genetic data suggest a major invasion event that is currently unfolding in southern South America with disastrous consequences for the native bumblebee species.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: not found
              • Article: not found

              The decline of the bumble bees and cuckoo bees (Hymenoptera: Apidae: Bombini) of Western and Central Europe

                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                Journal of Applied Ecology
                J Appl Ecol
                Wiley
                00218901
                March 05 2018
                :
                :
                Article
                10.1111/1365-2664.13121
                © 2018

                Comments

                Comment on this article