15
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: not found
      • Article: not found

      Multiparasite communities in animals and humans: frequency, structure and pathogenic significance

      ,
      International Journal for Parasitology
      Elsevier BV

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisherPubMed
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          Individual humans and animals are subject to infection by a variety of parasites (broadly defined to include viruses, bacteria and other non-protozoan microparasites) at any one time. Multiple parasite infections occur frequently in populations of wild animals as well as in humans from developing countries. In some species and regions, hosts with multiple infections are more common than hosts with either no infection or a single infection. Studies, predominantly on animals, show that a wide variety of environmental and host-dependent factors can influence the structure and dynamics of the communities of parasites that make up these multiple infections. In addition, synergistic and competitive interactions can occur between parasite species, which can influence the likelihood of their successful transmission to other hosts and increase or decrease their overall pathogenic impact. This review summarises aspects of our current knowledge on the frequency of multiparasite infections, the factors which influence them, and their pathogenic significance.

          Related collections

          Author and article information

          Journal
          International Journal for Parasitology
          International Journal for Parasitology
          Elsevier BV
          00207519
          March 1998
          March 1998
          : 28
          : 3
          : 377-393
          Article
          10.1016/S0020-7519(97)00189-6
          9559357
          d251eb06-6249-40dc-8bbd-283990fa0a80
          © 1998

          https://www.elsevier.com/tdm/userlicense/1.0/


          Comments

          Comment on this article