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      Playing hard to get: two new species of subterranean Trechini beetles (Coleoptera, Carabidae, Trechinae) from the Dinaric Karst

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      Deutsche Entomologische Zeitschrift

      Pensoft Publishers

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          Abstract

          Almost 200 years of continuous and systematic research in subterranean habitats of the Dinaric Karst and adjoining areas have resulted in the discovery of more than 400 specialized subterranean beetles. Among these, a special place belongs to the morphologically well distinguished and elusive, so called aphaenopsoid trechine beetles, which are characterized by a prolonged head, pronotum and appendages, and widened, ovoid-shaped elytra. Two new species of aphaenopsoid trechines – Derossiella lukici sp. n. from two deep pits on Mt Biokovo, Croatia, and Adriaphaenops petrimaris sp. n. from Pištet 4 Cave, Kameno more, Montenegro – are described, illustrated, and compared with closely related congeners. Identification keys for both genera and an annotated catalogue for all Adriaphaenops species, as well as data on the distribution and the ecology of these remarkable species, are provided and discussed.

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          The mid-latitude biodiversity ridge in terrestrial cave fauna

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            Ecomorphological convergence of cave communities.

            Extreme selective environments are commonly believed to funnel evolution toward a few predictable outcomes. Caves are well-known extreme environments with characteristically adapted faunas that are similar in appearance, physiology, and behavior all over the world, even if not closely related. Morphological diversity between closely related cave species has been explained by difference in time since colonization and different ecological influence from the surface. Here, we tested a more classical hypothesis: morphological diversity is niche-based, and different morphologies reflect properties of microhabitats within caves. We analyzed seven communities with altogether 30 species of the subterranean amphipod (crustacean) genus Niphargus using multivariate morphometrics, multinomial logit models cross-validation, and phylogenetic reconstruction. Species clustered into four distinct ecomorph classes-small pore, cave stream, cave lake, and lake giants-associated with specific cave microhabitats and of multiple independent phylogenetic origins. Traits commonly regarded as adaptations to caves, such as antenna length, were shown to be related to microhabitat parameters, such as flow velocity. These results demonstrate that under the selection pressure of extreme environment, the ecomorphological structure of communities can converge. Thus, morphological diversity does not result from adaptive response to temporal and ecological gradients, but from fine-level niche partitioning. © 2012 The Author(s). Evolution© 2012 The Society for the Study of Evolution.
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              Species richness patterns of obligate subterranean beetles (Insecta: Coleoptera) in a global biodiversity hotspot - effect of scale and sampling intensity

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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Deutsche Entomologische Zeitschrift
                DEZ
                Pensoft Publishers
                1860-1324
                1435-1951
                January 21 2019
                January 21 2019
                : 66
                : 1
                : 1-15
                Article
                10.3897/dez.66.31754
                © 2019

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