10
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: not found
      • Article: not found

      When the Going Gets Tough, Do the Tough Ask for Help? Help Seeking and Power Motivation in Organizations

      Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes

      Elsevier BV

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisher
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          Related collections

          Most cited references 46

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: not found
          • Article: not found

          Power-Dependence Relations

            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: not found

            Technology as an occasion for structuring: evidence from observations of CT scanners and the social order of radiology departments.

             R Barley (1986)
            New medical imaging devices, such as the CT scanner, have begun to challenge traditional role relations among radiologists and radiological technologists. Under some conditions, these technologies may actually alter the organizational and occupational structure of radiological work. However, current theories of technology and organizational form are insensitive to the potential number of structural variations implicit in role-based change. This paper expands recent sociological thought on the link between institution and action to outline a theory of how technology might occasion different organizational structures by altering institutionalized roles and patterns of interaction. In so doing, technology is treated as a social rather than a physical object, and structure is conceptualized as a process rather than an entity. The implications of the theory are illustrated by showing how identical CT scanners occasioned similar structuring processes in two radiology departments and yet led to divergent forms of organization. The data suggest that to understand how technologies alter organizational structures researchers may need to integrate the study of social action and the study of social form.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: not found

              Gender and relationships. A developmental account.

               E Maccoby (1990)
              This article argues that behavioral differentiation of the sexes is minimal when children are observed or tested individually. Sex differences emerge primarily in social situations, and their nature varies with the gender composition of dyads and groups. Children find same-sex play partners more compatible, and they segregate themselves into same-sex groups, in which distinctive interaction styles emerge. These styles are described. As children move into adolescence, the patterns they developed in their childhood same-sex groups are carried over into cross-sex encounters in which girls' styles put them at a disadvantage. Patterns of mutual influence can become more symmetrical in intimate male-female dyads, but the distinctive styles of the two sexes can still be seen in such dyads and are subsequently manifested in the roles and relationships of parenthood. The implications of these continuities are considered.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes
                Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes
                Elsevier BV
                07495978
                December 1997
                December 1997
                : 72
                : 3
                : 336-363
                Article
                10.1006/obhd.1997.2746
                © 1997

                Comments

                Comment on this article