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FISH Oracle 2: a web server for integrative visualization of genomic data in cancer research

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      Abstract

      Background

      A comprehensive view on all relevant genomic data is instrumental for understanding the complex patterns of molecular alterations typically found in cancer cells. One of the most effective ways to rapidly obtain an overview of genomic alterations in large amounts of genomic data is the integrative visualization of genomic events.

      Results

      We developed FISH Oracle 2, a web server for the interactive visualization of different kinds of downstream processed genomics data typically available in cancer research. A powerful search interface and a fast visualization engine provide a highly interactive visualization for such data. High quality image export enables the life scientist to easily communicate their results. A comprehensive data administration allows to keep track of the available data sets. We applied FISH Oracle 2 to published data and found evidence that, in colorectal cancer cells, the gene TTC28 may be inactivated in two different ways, a fact that has not been published before.

      Conclusions

      The interactive nature of FISH Oracle 2 and the possibility to store, select and visualize large amounts of downstream processed data support life scientists in generating hypotheses. The export of high quality images supports explanatory data visualization, simplifying the communication of new biological findings. A FISH Oracle 2 demo server and the software is available at http://www.zbh.uni-hamburg.de/fishoracle.

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      Most cited references 43

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      An Integrated Encyclopedia of DNA Elements in the Human Genome

      Summary The human genome encodes the blueprint of life, but the function of the vast majority of its nearly three billion bases is unknown. The Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE) project has systematically mapped regions of transcription, transcription factor association, chromatin structure, and histone modification. These data enabled us to assign biochemical functions for 80% of the genome, in particular outside of the well-studied protein-coding regions. Many discovered candidate regulatory elements are physically associated with one another and with expressed genes, providing new insights into the mechanisms of gene regulation. The newly identified elements also show a statistical correspondence to sequence variants linked to human disease, and can thereby guide interpretation of this variation. Overall the project provides new insights into the organization and regulation of our genes and genome, and an expansive resource of functional annotations for biomedical research.
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        An integrated map of genetic variation from 1,092 human genomes

        Summary Through characterising the geographic and functional spectrum of human genetic variation, the 1000 Genomes Project aims to build a resource to help understand the genetic contribution to disease. We describe the genomes of 1,092 individuals from 14 populations, constructed using a combination of low-coverage whole-genome and exome sequencing. By developing methodologies to integrate information across multiple algorithms and diverse data sources we provide a validated haplotype map of 38 million SNPs, 1.4 million indels and over 14 thousand larger deletions. We show that individuals from different populations carry different profiles of rare and common variants and that low-frequency variants show substantial geographic differentiation, which is further increased by the action of purifying selection. We show that evolutionary conservation and coding consequence are key determinants of the strength of purifying selection, that rare-variant load varies substantially across biological pathways and that each individual harbours hundreds of rare non-coding variants at conserved sites, such as transcription-factor-motif disrupting changes. This resource, which captures up to 98% of accessible SNPs at a frequency of 1% in populations of medical genetics focus, enables analysis of common and low-frequency variants in individuals from diverse, including admixed, populations.
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          Comprehensive Molecular Characterization of Human Colon and Rectal Cancer

          Summary To characterize somatic alterations in colorectal carcinoma (CRC), we conducted genome-scale analysis of 276 samples, analyzing exome sequence, DNA copy number, promoter methylation, mRNA and microRNA expression. A subset (97) underwent low-depth-of-coverage whole-genome sequencing. 16% of CRC have hypermutation, three quarters of which have the expected high microsatellite instability (MSI), usually with hypermethylation and MLH1 silencing, but one quarter has somatic mismatch repair gene mutations. Excluding hypermutated cancers, colon and rectum cancers have remarkably similar patterns of genomic alteration. Twenty-four genes are significantly mutated. In addition to the expected APC, TP53, SMAD4, PIK3CA and KRAS mutations, we found frequent mutations in ARID1A, SOX9, and FAM123B/WTX. Recurrent copy number alterations include potentially drug-targetable amplifications of ERBB2 and newly discovered amplification of IGF2. Recurrent chromosomal translocations include fusion of NAV2 and WNT pathway member TCF7L1. Integrative analyses suggest new markers for aggressive CRC and important role for MYC-directed transcriptional activation and repression.
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            Author and article information

            Affiliations
            [1 ]Center for Bioinformatics, University of Hamburg, Bundesstrasse 43, 20146 Hamburg, Germany
            [2 ]Department of Pathology, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Martinistrasse 52, 20246 Hamburg, Germany
            Contributors
            Journal
            J Clin Bioinforma
            J Clin Bioinforma
            Journal of Clinical Bioinformatics
            BioMed Central
            2043-9113
            2014
            31 March 2014
            : 4
            : 5
            24684958 4230720 2043-9113-4-5 10.1186/2043-9113-4-5
            Copyright © 2014 Mader et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

            This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License ( http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver ( http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated.

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