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      Pedestrian fatality and impact speed squared: Cloglog modeling from French national data

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      Traffic Injury Prevention
      Informa UK Limited

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          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          The present study estimates pedestrians' risk of death according to impact speed when hit by a passenger car in a frontal collision.

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          Most cited references33

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          Model-based estimation of relative risks and other epidemiologic measures in studies of common outcomes and in case-control studies.

          Some recent articles have discussed biased methods for estimating risk ratios from adjusted odds ratios when the outcome is common, and the problem of setting confidence limits for risk ratios. These articles have overlooked the extensive literature on valid estimation of risks, risk ratios, and risk differences from logistic and other models, including methods that remain valid when the outcome is common, and methods for risk and rate estimation from case-control studies. The present article describes how most of these methods can be subsumed under a general formulation that also encompasses traditional standardization methods and methods for projecting the impact of partially successful interventions. Approximate variance formulas for the resulting estimates allow interval estimation; these intervals can be closely approximated by rapid simulation procedures that require only standard software functions.
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            Capture-Recapture Methods in Epidemiology: Methods and Limitations

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              Pedestrian crash trends and potential countermeasures from around the world.

              As automobile transportation continues to increase around the world, bicyclists, pedestrians, and motorcyclists, also known as vulnerable road users (VRUs), will become more susceptible to traffic crashes, especially in countries where traffic laws are poorly enforced. Many countries, however, are employing innovative strategies to ensure that road users can more safely navigate the urban landscape. While bicyclists and motorcyclists are important road users, this paper will focus on pedestrian crash problems and solutions. Pedestrians are most at risk in urban areas due in part to the large amount of pedestrian and vehicle activity in urban areas. With this in mind, designing safe, accessible, and comprehensive facilities for pedestrians is vital to reducing pedestrian crashes. This paper will provide some insight into the magnitude of the pedestrian crash problem around the world, and will offer some lessons learned from several countries, particularly in Europe and the U.S., for improving pedestrian safety. Beginning with pedestrian safety statistics at the global, regional, and national levels, this paper will address potential countermeasures and strategies for improving pedestrian safety from an international perspective. 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Traffic Injury Prevention
                Traffic Injury Prevention
                Informa UK Limited
                1538-9588
                1538-957X
                June 14 2017
                May 30 2017
                : 19
                : 1
                : 94-101
                Article
                10.1080/15389588.2017.1332408
                28557669
                d30153f6-944c-4936-aea6-90ea61d5c73c
                © 2017
                History

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