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      A Comparative Literature Review on Contributions of Social workers in Kenya and Slovakia to Palliative Care Multidisciplinary Team (Review)

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      Clinical Social Work and Health Intervention

      Journal of Clinical Social Work and Health Intervention

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          Abstract

          Introduction: Effective Management of terminally ill patients involves a multidisciplinary team. Social Work is one of the professions that contributes to this team. Objective of this review is to compare how Social Workers in Kenya and Slovakia contribute to the palliative care team. Methods: A traditional type of literature review was employed in writing this article. It involved search of articles published in online databases such as ProQuest Central, Oxford Journals, Science Direct, Springer Link and Wiley Online Library. Some of the key words used were: Palliative Care and Multidisciplinary Team. Results: Social Workers in both countries contribute to a multidisciplinary team with slight differences. For instance, Slovak Social Workers focus more on social advocacy such as seeking powers of the attorney to represent their clients in state offices unlike to their counterparts in Kenya who only come into contact with the legal system when summoned by Courts of law. Conclusion: In both countries, Kenya and Slovakia, Social Workers immensely contribute to the multidisciplinary team which goes a long way in addressing factors that may hamper effectiveness of palliative care.

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          Most cited references 4

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          Measurement of the pressure dependence of air fluorescence emission induced by electrons

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            Incidence of cancer in Nairobi, Kenya (2004-2008).

            Cancer incidence rates are presented for the Nairobi Cancer Registry, a population-based cancer registry (PBCR) covering the population of the capital city of Kenya (3.2 million inhabitants in 2009). Case finding was by active methods, with standard and checks for accuracy and validity. During the period 2004-2008 a total of 8,982 cases were registered comprising 3,889 men (an age standardized incidence rate (ASR) of 161 per 100,000) and 5,093 women (ASR 231 per 1,00,000). Prostate cancer was the most common cancer in men (ASR 40.6 per 100,000) while breast cancer was the most common among women (ASR 51.7 per 100,000). Cervical cancer ranked the second most common cancer among women in Nairobi with an ASR of 46.1 per 100,000, somewhat lower than those of other registries in East Africa region. Breast and cervical cancers accounted for 44% of all cancers in women. Cancer of the oesophagus was common in both sexes, with a slight excess of cases in men (sex ratio 1.3). Unlike other regions in East Africa, the rate of Kaposi sarcoma was relatively low during the period (men 3.6/100,000; women 2.0/100,000). Although incidence rates cannot be calculated for the early years of the registry, the increase in relative frequency of prostate cancer and declines in frequency of Kaposi sarcoma may indicate underlying trends in the risk of these cancers.
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              Cancer and palliative care in Africa

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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Clinical Social Work and Health Intervention
                CSWHI
                Journal of Clinical Social Work and Health Intervention
                2222386X
                20769741
                December 28 2017
                December 28 2017
                : 8
                : 4
                : 75-78
                Article
                10.22359/cswhi_8_4_09
                © 2017

                This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 Unported License. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

                Psychology, Social & Behavioral Sciences

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