6
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: found
      Is Open Access

      Preventive Dental Care Utilization in Asian Americans in Austin, Texas: Does Neighborhood Matter?

      Read this article at

      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          Although dental care is an essential component of comprehensive health care, a substantial proportion of the U.S. population lacks access to it. Disparities in dental care are most pronounced in racial/ethnic minority communities. Given the rapid population growth of Asian Americans, as well as the growing attention of neighborhood-level effects on health care use, the present study examines how individual-level variables (i.e., age, gender, marital status, ethnicity, education, place of birth, length of stay in the U.S., dental insurance, and self-rated oral health) and neighborhood-level variables (i.e., poverty level, density of Asian population, dentist availability, and Asian-related resources and services) contribute to predicting the use of preventive dental care in a sample of Asian Americans in Austin, TX. This study adds to the growing literature on the effect of neighborhood-level factors on health care as sources of disparities. Those living in the Census area with higher level of available dentists were more likely to use preventive dental care services. Findings suggest the importance of the location (proximity or accessibility) to dental clinics. In a planning perspective for health care policy, identifying the neighborhood with limited healthcare services could be a priority to diminish the disparity of the access.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 30

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          Neighborhood environment in studies of health of older adults: a systematic review.

          Epidemiologists and public health researchers are studying neighborhood's effect on individual health. The health of older adults may be more influenced by their neighborhoods as a result of decreased mobility. However, research on neighborhood's influence on older adults' health, specifically, is limited. Recent studies on neighborhood and health for older adults were identified. Studies were identified through searches of databases including PsycINFO, CINAHL, PubMed, Academic Search Premier, Ageline, Social Science Citation Index, and Health Source. Criteria for inclusion were as follows: human studies; English language; study sample included adults aged > or =55 years; health outcomes, including mental health, health behaviors, morbidity, and mortality; neighborhood as the primary exposure variable of interest; empirical research; and studies that included > or =10 neighborhoods. Air pollution studies were excluded. Five hundred thirty-eight relevant articles were published during 1997-2007; a total of 33 of these articles met inclusion criteria. The measures of objective and perceived aspects of neighborhood were summarized. Neighborhood was primarily operationalized using census-defined boundaries. Measures of neighborhood were principally derived from objective sources of data; eight studies assessed perceived neighborhood alone or in combination with objective measures. Six categories of neighborhood characteristics were socioeconomic composition, racial composition, demographics, perceived resources and/or problems, physical environment, and social environment. The studies are primarily cross-sectional and use administrative data to characterize neighborhood. These studies suggest that neighborhood environment is important for older adults' health and functioning.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: not found

            Immigrants and health care: sources of vulnerability.

            Immigrants have been identified as a vulnerable population, but there is heterogeneity in the degree to which they are vulnerable to inadequate health care. Here we examine the factors that affect immigrants' vulnerability, including socioeconomic background; immigration status; limited English proficiency; federal, state, and local policies on access to publicly funded health care; residential location; and stigma and marginalization. We find that, overall, immigrants have lower rates of health insurance, use less health care, and receive lower quality of care than U.S.-born populations; however, there are differences among subgroups. We conclude with policy options for addressing immigrants' vulnerabilities.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: not found

              Neighborhood context and mortality among older Mexican Americans: is there a barrio advantage?

              We examined whether Mexican Americans living in high-density Mexican American neighborhoods experience increased morbidity and mortality compared with the rates observed among Mexican Americans living in low-density areas. We conducted a prospective analysis of a cohort of 3050 Mexican Americans aged 65 years or older. We examined prevalence of 6 medical conditions and survival over 7 years of follow-up in relation to percentage of Mexican Americans in the census tract. With adjustment for covariates, odds for disease prevalence among older Mexican Americans as a function of percentage of Mexican Americans in the census tract were 0.33 (95% confidence interval [CI]=0.16, 0.71) for stroke, 0.28 (95% CI= 0.11, 0.70) for cancer, and 0.31 (95% CI=0.10, 0.98) for hip fracture. The hazard ratio for all-cause mortality over 7 years' follow-up was 0.64 (95% CI=0.42, 0.96). Sociocultural advantages conferred on Mexican Americans by living in high-density Mexican American neighborhoods outweigh the disadvantages conferred by the high poverty of those neighborhoods.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                Int J Environ Res Public Health
                Int J Environ Res Public Health
                ijerph
                International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
                MDPI
                1661-7827
                1660-4601
                16 October 2018
                October 2018
                : 15
                : 10
                Affiliations
                [1 ]School of Social Work, The Texas State University, San Marcos, TX 78666, USA
                [2 ]Edward R. Roybal Institute on Aging, Suzanne Dworak-Peck School of Social Work, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90007, USA; yurij@ 123456usc.edu
                [3 ]Haskayne School of Business, Faculty of Environmental Design, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB T2N 1N4, Canada; kwangyul.choi1@ 123456ucalgary.ca
                [4 ]Department of Geography, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996, USA; hkim56@ 123456utk.edu
                Author notes
                [* ]Correspondence: hyoon@ 123456txstate.edu ; Tel.: +1-512-245-2592; Fax: +1-512-245-8097
                Article
                ijerph-15-02261
                10.3390/ijerph15102261
                6210422
                30332736
                © 2018 by the authors.

                Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. This article is an open access article distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) license ( http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).

                Categories
                Article

                Comments

                Comment on this article