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      Sensor Mania! The Internet of Things, Wearable Computing, Objective Metrics, and the Quantified Self 2.0

      Journal of Sensor and Actuator Networks
      MDPI AG

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          A wearable sensor for unobtrusive, long-term assessment of electrodermal activity.

          Electrodermal activity (EDA) is a sensitive index of sympathetic nervous system activity. Due to the lack of sensors that can be worn comfortably during normal daily activity and over extensive periods of time, research in this area is limited to laboratory settings or artificial clinical environments. We developed a novel, unobtrusive, nonstigmatizing, wrist-worn integrated sensor, and present, for the very first time, a demonstration of long-term, continuous assessment of EDA outside of a laboratory setting. We evaluated the performance of our device against a Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved system for the measurement of EDA during physical, cognitive, as well as emotional stressors at both palmar and distal forearm sites, and found high correlations across all the tests. We also evaluated the choice of electrode material by comparing conductive fabric with Ag/AgCl electrodes and discuss the limitations found. An important result presented in this paper is evidence that the distal forearm is a viable alternative to the traditional palmar sites for EDA measurements. Our device offers the unprecedented ability to perform comfortable, long-term, and in situ assessment of EDA. This paper opens up opportunities for future investigations that were previously not feasible, and could have far-reaching implications for diagnosis and understanding of psychological or neurological conditions.
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            Using personal glucose meters and functional DNA sensors to quantify a variety of analytical targets.

            Portable, low-cost and quantitative detection of a broad range of targets at home and in the field has the potential to revolutionize medical diagnostics and environmental monitoring. Despite many years of research, very few such devices are commercially available. Taking advantage of the wide availability and low cost of the pocket-sized personal glucose meter-used worldwide by diabetes sufferers-we demonstrate a method to use such meters to quantify non-glucose targets, ranging from a recreational drug (cocaine, 3.4 µM detection limit) to an important biological cofactor (adenosine, 18 µM detection limit), to a disease marker (interferon-gamma of tuberculosis, 2.6 nM detection limit) and a toxic metal ion (uranium, 9.1 nM detection limit). The method is based on the target-induced release of invertase from a functional-DNA-invertase conjugate. The released invertase converts sucrose into glucose, which is detectable using the meter. The approach should be easily applicable to the detection of many other targets through the use of suitable functional-DNA partners (aptamers, DNAzymes or aptazymes).
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              Health 2050: The Realization of Personalized Medicine through Crowdsourcing, the Quantified Self, and the Participatory Biocitizen

              The concepts of health and health care are moving towards the notion of personalized preventive health maintenance and away from an exclusive focus on the cure of disease. This is against the backdrop of contemporary public health challenges that include increasing costs, worsening outcomes, ‘diabesity’ epidemics, and anticipated physician shortages. Personalized preventive medicine could be critical to solving public health challenges at their causal root. This paper sets forth a vision and plan for the realization of preventive medicine by 2050 and examines efforts already underway such as participatory health initiatives, the era of big health data, and qualitative shifts in mindset.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Journal of Sensor and Actuator Networks
                JSAN
                MDPI AG
                2224-2708
                December 2012
                November 08 2012
                : 1
                : 3
                : 217-253
                Article
                10.3390/jsan1030217
                d35d5582-dc1a-4bba-8c5a-3b6068cb2929
                © 2012

                https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

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