Blog
About

4
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: not found
      • Article: not found

      Does resistance training modulate cardiac autonomic control? A systematic review and meta-analysis

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisher
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 71

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          Increased rate of force development and neural drive of human skeletal muscle following resistance training.

          The maximal rate of rise in muscle force [rate of force development (RFD)] has important functional consequences as it determines the force that can be generated in the early phase of muscle contraction (0-200 ms). The present study examined the effect of resistance training on contractile RFD and efferent motor outflow ("neural drive") during maximal muscle contraction. Contractile RFD (slope of force-time curve), impulse (time-integrated force), electromyography (EMG) signal amplitude (mean average voltage), and rate of EMG rise (slope of EMG-time curve) were determined (1-kHz sampling rate) during maximal isometric muscle contraction (quadriceps femoris) in 15 male subjects before and after 14 wk of heavy-resistance strength training (38 sessions). Maximal isometric muscle strength [maximal voluntary contraction (MVC)] increased from 291.1 +/- 9.8 to 339.0 +/- 10.2 N. m after training. Contractile RFD determined within time intervals of 30, 50, 100, and 200 ms relative to onset of contraction increased from 1,601 +/- 117 to 2,020 +/- 119 (P < 0.05), 1,802 +/- 121 to 2,201 +/- 106 (P < 0.01), 1,543 +/- 83 to 1,806 +/- 69 (P < 0.01), and 1,141 +/- 45 to 1,363 +/- 44 N. m. s(-1) (P < 0.01), respectively. Corresponding increases were observed in contractile impulse (P < 0.01-0.05). When normalized relative to MVC, contractile RFD increased 15% after training (at zero to one-sixth MVC; P < 0.05). Furthermore, muscle EMG increased (P < 0.01-0.05) 22-143% (mean average voltage) and 41-106% (rate of EMG rise) in the early contraction phase (0-200 ms). In conclusion, increases in explosive muscle strength (contractile RFD and impulse) were observed after heavy-resistance strength training. These findings could be explained by an enhanced neural drive, as evidenced by marked increases in EMG signal amplitude and rate of EMG rise in the early phase of muscle contraction.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: not found

            Resistance exercise in individuals with and without cardiovascular disease: 2007 update: a scientific statement from the American Heart Association Council on Clinical Cardiology and Council on Nutrition, Physical Activity, and Metabolism.

            Prescribed and supervised resistance training (RT) enhances muscular strength and endurance, functional capacity and independence, and quality of life while reducing disability in persons with and without cardiovascular disease. These benefits have made RT an accepted component of programs for health and fitness. The American Heart Association recommendations describing the rationale for participation in and considerations for prescribing RT were published in 2000. This update provides current information regarding the (1) health benefits of RT, (2) impact of RT on the cardiovascular system structure and function, (3) role of RT in modifying cardiovascular disease risk factors, (4) benefits in selected populations, (5) process of medical evaluation for participation in RT, and (6) prescriptive methods. The purpose of this update is to provide clinicians with recommendations to facilitate the use of this valuable modality.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: not found

              Changes in autonomic regulation induced by physical training in mild hypertension.

              The adaptive effects of physical training on cardiovascular control mechanisms were studied in 11 subjects with mild hypertension. In these subjects we assessed the gain of the heart period-systolic arterial pressure relationship in the unfit and the fit state by using 1) an open loop approach, whereby the gain is expressed by the slope of the regression of heart period as a function of systolic arterial pressure, during a phenylephrine-induced pressure rise and 2) a closed loop approach with proper simplification, whereby the gain is expressed by the index alpha, obtained through simultaneous spectral analysis of the spontaneous variabilities of heart period and systolic arterial pressure. Both methods indicated that training significantly increased the gain of the relationship between heart period and systolic arterial pressure at rest and reduced arterial pressure and increased heart period significantly. This gain was drastically reduced during bicycle exercise both in the unfit and fit state. In a second group of normotensive (n = 7; systolic pressure, 133 +/- 3 mm Hg) and hypertensive (n = 7; systolic pressure, 180 +/- 10 mm Hg) subjects undergoing 24-hour diagnostic continuous electrocardiographic and high fidelity arterial pressure monitoring, the index alpha was significantly reduced in the hypertensive group at rest. Furthermore, when analyzed continuously over the entire 24-hour period, this index underwent minute-to-minute changes with lower values during the day and higher values during the night. We propose the index alpha as a quantitative indicator of the changes in the gain of baroreceptor mechanisms occurring with physical training in mild hypertension and during a 24-hour period in ambulatory subjects.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                Clinical Autonomic Research
                Clin Auton Res
                Springer Science and Business Media LLC
                0959-9851
                1619-1560
                February 2019
                August 23 2018
                February 2019
                : 29
                : 1
                : 75-103
                Article
                10.1007/s10286-018-0558-3
                © 2019

                Comments

                Comment on this article