Blog
About

4
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: not found
      • Article: not found

      A Michaelis–Menten type equation for describing methylmercury dependence on inorganic mercury in aquatic sediments

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisher
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 56

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          The toxicology of mercury and its chemical compounds.

           L Magos,  T W Clarkson (2006)
          This review covers the toxicology of mercury and its compounds. Special attention is paid to those forms of mercury of current public health concern. Human exposure to the vapor of metallic mercury dates back to antiquity but continues today in occupational settings and from dental amalgam. Health risks from methylmercury in edible tissues of fish have been the subject of several large epidemiological investigations and continue to be the subject of intense debate. Ethylmercury in the form of a preservative, thimerosal, added to certain vaccines, is the most recent form of mercury that has become a public health concern. The review leads to general discussion of evolutionary aspects of mercury, protective and toxic mechanisms, and ends on a note that mercury is still an "element of mystery."
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: not found
            • Article: not found

            Sulfate stimulation of mercury methylation in freshwater sediments

              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: not found

              Interactions between mercury and dissolved organic matter--a review.

              Dissolved organic matter (DOM) interacts very strongly with mercury, affecting its speciation, solubility, mobility, and toxicity in the aquatic environment. Strong binding of mercury by DOM is attributed to coordination of mercury at reduced sulfur sites within the organic matter, which are present at concentrations much higher than mercury concentrations found in most natural waters. The ability of organic matter to enhance the dissolution and inhibit the precipitation of mercuric sulfide, a highly insoluble solid, suggests that DOM competes with sulfide for mercury binding. This is confirmed by very high conditional stability constants for mercury-organic sulfur (RSHg+) complexes (10(25)-10(32)) recently reported in literature. DOM appears to play a key role in the photochemical reduction of ionic mercury to elemental mercury and subsequent reoxidation of elemental mercury to ionic mercury, thus affecting volatilization loss and bioavailability of mercury to organisms. DOM affects the production and bioaccumulation of methylmercury, the most bioaccumulative mercury species in fish.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                Biogeochemistry
                Biogeochemistry
                Springer Nature
                0168-2563
                1573-515X
                June 2014
                November 7 2013
                June 2014
                : 119
                : 1-3
                : 35-43
                Article
                10.1007/s10533-013-9924-3
                © 2014
                Product

                Comments

                Comment on this article