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      Burning up and burning out. Human Sustainability in a Time of Emotional Climate Change

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          Abstract

          The world is focused on countering climate change to guarantee our survival. But as our planet burns up, we are burning out. The costs of mental health disorders dwarf those of climate change and yet do not get commensurate attention from global leaders. Health care providers and organizations have acted first but need support of the financial markets and public decision-makers. In this paper, we argue that the economic and social toll of mental health and wellbeing issues deserve equal attention from business and public leaders because Human Sustainability is as important as Environmental Sustainability for our ability to endure and thrive as a species in harmony with others.

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          The social readjustment rating scale

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            The economic burden of adults with major depressive disorder in the United States (2005 and 2010).

            The economic burden of depression in the United States--including major depressive disorder (MDD), bipolar disorder, and dysthymia--was estimated at $83.1 billion in 2000. We update these findings using recent data, focusing on MDD alone and accounting for comorbid physical and psychiatric disorders.
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              Workplace wellness programs can generate savings.

              Amid soaring health spending, there is growing interest in workplace disease prevention and wellness programs to improve health and lower costs. In a critical meta-analysis of the literature on costs and savings associated with such programs, we found that medical costs fall by about $3.27 for every dollar spent on wellness programs and that absenteeism costs fall by about $2.73 for every dollar spent. Although further exploration of the mechanisms at work and broader applicability of the findings is needed, this return on investment suggests that the wider adoption of such programs could prove beneficial for budgets and productivity as well as health outcomes.
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                Author and article information

                Contributors
                (View ORCID Profile)
                (View ORCID Profile)
                Journal
                Academicus International Scientific Journal
                Academicus Journal
                20793715
                23091088
                January 2022
                January 2022
                : 25
                : 56-74
                Affiliations
                [1 ]Harvard Business School, USA
                [2 ]Executive Director at Harvard University, USA
                Article
                10.7336/academicus.2022.25.04
                d4951816-c5a4-462a-8fec-32e85d2a5eb5
                © 2022

                https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/

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