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      Aquatic macroinvertebrates in Uruguayan rice agroecosystem

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          Abstract

          This work is a first approach to the knowledge of insects and other aquatic macroinvertebrates of rice agroecosystems from eastern Uruguay. The composition of the groups collected may represent an approximation to the knowledge of the quality of water sources associated with Uruguayan rice production. Sampling of aquatic macroinvertebrates was carried out during the grain-filling stage in crops without insecticide use, in three localities of Treinta y Tres Department. In each crop, macroinvertebrates were collected with a Surber-type network at the inlet and outlet of water to and from the paddy field and a neighbouring control area. Differences in morphospecies composition were found according to the location and source of water. Insecta was the most represented class in macroinvertebrate samplings (41.5%). Diptera (59.9%), Hemiptera (16.3%) and Ephemeroptera (14.0%) were the most abundant orders within insects. The Richness and Shannon Diversity Indices were higher than those recorded for similar studies in Costa Rica, Italy and Australia.

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          Most cited references 45

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          EstimateS: Statistical estimation of species richness and shared species from samples

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            Freshwater biodiversity and aquatic insect diversification.

            Inland waters cover less than 1% of Earth's surface but harbor more than 6% of all insect species: Nearly 100,000 species from 12 orders spend one or more life stages in freshwater. Little is known about how this remarkable diversity arose, although allopatric speciation and ecological adaptation are thought to be primary mechanisms. Freshwater habitats are highly susceptible to environmental change and exhibit marked ecological gradients. Standing waters appear to harbor more dispersive species than running waters, but there is little understanding of how this fundamental ecological difference has affected diversification. In contrast to the lack of evolutionary studies, the ecology and habitat preferences of aquatic insects have been intensively studied, in part because of their widespread use as bioindicators. The combination of phylogenetics with the extensive ecological data provides a promising avenue for future research, making aquatic insects highly suitable models for the study of ecological diversification.
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              PAST: paleontological sta-tistics software package for education and data analysis

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                Author and article information

                Contributors
                Journal
                Biodivers Data J
                Biodivers Data J
                1
                urn:lsid:arphahub.com:pub:F9B2E808-C883-5F47-B276-6D62129E4FF4
                urn:lsid:zoobank.org:pub:245B00E9-BFE5-4B4F-B76E-15C30BA74C02
                Biodiversity Data Journal
                Pensoft Publishers
                1314-2836
                1314-2828
                2021
                04 March 2021
                : 9
                Affiliations
                [1 ] Crop Protection Department, University of Republic, Montevideo, Uruguay, Montevideo, Uruguay Crop Protection Department, University of Republic, Montevideo, Uruguay Montevideo Uruguay
                [2 ] Instituto Nacional de Investigación Agropecuaria (INIA), Programa Nacional de Investigación en Producción de Arroz, Laboratorio de Patología Vegetal, Estación Experimental INIA Treinta y Tres, Ruta 8 km 281, Treinta y Tres, C.P. 33000, Treinta y Tres, Uruguay Instituto Nacional de Investigación Agropecuaria (INIA), Programa Nacional de Investigación en Producción de Arroz, Laboratorio de Patología Vegetal, Estación Experimental INIA Treinta y Tres, Ruta 8 km 281, Treinta y Tres, C.P. 33000 Treinta y Tres Uruguay
                [3 ] Department of Statistical Biometrics and Computing, University of Republic, Paysandú, Uruguay Department of Statistical Biometrics and Computing, University of Republic Paysandú Uruguay
                [4 ] University of Republic, Montevideo, Uruguay University of Republic Montevideo Uruguay
                [5 ] Eastern Region University Centre, University of Republic, Rocha, Uruguay Eastern Region University Centre, University of Republic Rocha Uruguay
                Author notes
                Corresponding author: Leticia Bao ( baoleticia@ 123456gmail.com ).

                Academic editor: Ben Price

                Article
                60745 15086
                10.3897/BDJ.9.e60745
                7952373
                Leticia Bao, Sebastián Martínez, Mónica Cadenazzi, Mónica Urrutia, Lucía Seijas, Enrique Castiglioni

                This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY 4.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

                Page count
                Figures: 5, Tables: 6, References: 43
                Categories
                Research Article

                biodiversity, bio-indicators, water quality

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