Blog
About

9
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: not found
      • Article: not found

      Driven to Distraction: Dual-Task Studies of Simulated Driving and Conversing on a Cellular Telephone

      ,

      Psychological Science

      Wiley-Blackwell

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisher
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 11

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          Association between cellular-telephone calls and motor vehicle collisions.

          Because of a belief that the use of cellular telephones while driving may cause collisions, several countries have restricted their use in motor vehicles, and others are considering such regulations. We used an epidemiologic method, the case-crossover design, to study whether using a cellular telephone while driving increases the risk of a motor vehicle collision. We studied 699 drivers who had cellular telephones and who were involved in motor vehicle collisions resulting in substantial property damage but no personal injury. Each person's cellular-telephone calls on the day of the collision and during the previous week were analyzed through the use of detailed billing records. A total of 26,798 cellular-telephone calls were made during the 14-month study period. The risk of a collision when using a cellular telephone was four times higher than the risk when a cellular telephone was not being used (relative risk, 4.3; 95 percent confidence interval, 3.0 to 6.5). The relative risk was similar for drivers who differed in personal characteristics such as age and driving experience; calls close to the time of the collision were particularly hazardous (relative risk, 4.8 for calls placed within 5 minutes of the accident, as compared with 1.3 for calls placed more than 15 minutes before the accident; P<0.001); and units that allowed the hands to be free (relative risk, 5.9) offered no safety advantage over hand-held units (relative risk, 3.9; P not significant). Thirty-nine percent of the drivers called emergency services after the collision, suggesting that having a cellular telephone may have had advantages in the aftermath of an event. The use of cellular telephones in motor vehicles is associated with a quadrupling of the risk of a collision during the brief time interval involving a call. Decisions about regulation of such telephones, however, need to take into account the benefits of the technology and the role of individual responsibility.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: not found
            • Article: not found

            Psychology Will Be a Much Better Science When We Change the Way We Analyze Data.

              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: not found
              • Article: not found

              The effects of a mobile telephone task on driver behaviour in a car following situation

                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                Psychological Science
                Psychol Sci
                Wiley-Blackwell
                0956-7976
                1467-9280
                May 06 2016
                May 06 2016
                : 12
                : 6
                : 462-466
                Article
                10.1111/1467-9280.00386
                © 2016

                Comments

                Comment on this article