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      Ecology and epidemiology of dermatophyte infections

      Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology

      Elsevier BV

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          Abstract

          Our knowledge of ecology and epidemiology of dermatophytes and the factors influencing their transmission has helped us understand better the natural history of dermatophytoses. It seems that the anthropophilic agents of scalp infection are being eradicated in developing nations. The exception is Trichophyton tonsurans-related tinea capitis in North America. Microsporum canis is a prevalent agent of tinea capitis in many regions of the world, and this could be related to close association of humans with their pets. Trichophyton violaceum is endemic in certain parts of Eastern Europe, Africa, Asia, and South America but not in North America. Trichophyton rubrum is the most common cause worldwide of tinea pedis, nail infection, tinea cruris, and tinea corporis. Although the incidence of tinea capitis is declining in developed nations, tinea pedis and onychomycosis are becoming more common. The increased use of athletic shoes both by men and women and communal bathing could be contributing factors. Five or six species account for most dermatophytoses globally.

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          Author and article information

          Journal
          Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology
          Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology
          Elsevier BV
          01909622
          September 1994
          September 1994
          : 31
          : 3
          : S21-S25
          Article
          8077503
          © 1994

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