9
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
1 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: found
      Is Open Access

      Review of docetaxel in the treatment of gastric cancer

      Read this article at

      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          Gastric cancer is a global health problem accounting for 800,000 cancer related deaths annually. Often diagnosed at an advanced stage, the treatment of gastric cancer with chemotherapy is directed towards palliating cancer related symptoms with only modest improvements in survival. In addition, no regimen has emerged as a globally accepted standard. New therapeutic options are desperately needed for the treatment of gastric cancer. Docetaxel given in combination has recently emerged as a new option for patients with advanced gastric cancer. This review focuses on the treatment of advanced gastric cancer utilizing docetaxel-based therapy and the novel additions of biotherapy to the existing cytotoxic platforms. In addition, the current investigations of docetaxel for the treatment of potentially curable gastric cancer will be discussed.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 53

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          Capecitabine and oxaliplatin for advanced esophagogastric cancer.

           ,  Sheela Rao,  P. J. Oates (2008)
          We evaluated capecitabine (an oral fluoropyrimidine) and oxaliplatin (a platinum compound) as alternatives to infused fluorouracil and cisplatin, respectively, for untreated advanced esophagogastric cancer. In a two-by-two design, we randomly assigned 1002 patients to receive triplet therapy with epirubicin and cisplatin plus either fluorouracil (ECF) or capecitabine (ECX) or triplet therapy with epirubicin and oxaliplatin plus either fluorouracil (EOF) or capecitabine (EOX). The primary end point was noninferiority in overall survival for the triplet therapies containing capecitabine as compared with fluorouracil and for those containing oxaliplatin as compared with cisplatin. For the capecitabine-fluorouracil comparison, the hazard ratio for death in the capecitabine group was 0.86 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.80 to 0.99); for the oxaliplatin-cisplatin comparison, the hazard ratio for the oxaliplatin group was 0.92 (95% CI, 0.80 to 1.10). The upper limit of the confidence intervals for both hazard ratios excluded the predefined noninferiority margin of 1.23. Median survival times in the ECF, ECX, EOF, and EOX groups were 9.9 months, 9.9 months, 9.3 months, and 11.2 months, respectively; survival rates at 1 year were 37.7%, 40.8%, 40.4%, and 46.8%, respectively. In the secondary analysis, overall survival was longer with EOX than with ECF, with a hazard ratio for death of 0.80 in the EOX group (95% CI, 0.66 to 0.97; P=0.02). Progression-free survival and response rates did not differ significantly among the regimens. Toxic effects of capecitabine and fluorouracil were similar. As compared with cisplatin, oxaliplatin was associated with lower incidences of grade 3 or 4 neutropenia, alopecia, renal toxicity, and thromboembolism but with slightly higher incidences of grade 3 or 4 diarrhea and neuropathy. Capecitabine and oxaliplatin are as effective as fluorouracil and cisplatin, respectively, in patients with previously untreated esophagogastric cancer. (Current Controlled Trials number, ISRCTN51678883 [controlled-trials.com].). Copyright 2008 Massachusetts Medical Society.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: not found

            Randomised comparison of fluorouracil, epidoxorubicin and methotrexate (FEMTX) plus supportive care with supportive care alone in patients with non-resectable gastric cancer.

            A phase III randomised study, comparing treatment with fluorouracil, epidoxorubicin and methotrexate (FEMTX) with the best supportive care, was conducted in patients with unresectable or metastatic gastric cancer. During the period from July 1986 to June 1992, 41 patients were randomised to receive FEMTX or best supportive care. MTX was given in a dose of 1500 mg m-2 intravenously (i.v.) followed after 1 h by 5-FU 1500 mg m-2 i.v. on day 1; leucovorin rescue was started after 24 h (30 mg orally every 6 h for 48 h) and epidoxorubicin 60 mg m-2 i.v. was administered on day 15. In addition both groups received tablets containing vitamins A and E. Response rates for FEMTX were as follows: complete response (CR), 19% (4/21); partial response (PR), 10% (2/21); no change (NC), 33% (7/21); and progressive disease (PD), 24% (5/21). Response rates in the control group were: NC, 20% (4/20); and PD, 80% (16/20). Increased pain was observed in one patient in the treated group and in 11 patients in the control group within the first 2 months. WHO grade III/IV toxicity in the chemotherapy group was as follows: nausea/vomiting 40%, diarrhoea 10%, stomatitis 15%, leucopenia 50% and thrombocytopenia 10%. One possible treatment-related death was due to sepsis. The median time to progression in the FEMTX group was 5.4 months [95% confidence interval (CI) 3.1-11.7 months], but only 1.7 months in the control group (95% CI 1.2-2.7 months) (P = 0.0013). Similarly, the FEMTX group displayed significantly (P = 0.0006) prolonged survival compared with the control group, i.e. median survival 12.3 months (95% CI 7.1-15.6 months) vs 3.1 months (95% CI 1.6-4.6 months). In conclusion, FEMTX combined with vitamin A and E is a fairly well-tolerated treatment, giving a response rate of 29% in patients with advanced gastric cancer, and also prolonging patients' survival. It can be used as a reference treatment in testing new investigational combinations.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: not found

              Modified therapy with 5-fluorouracil, doxorubicin, and methotrexate in advanced gastric cancer.

              In an attempt to decrease the toxic effects of fluorouracil, doxorubicin, and methotrexate (FAMTX) by reducing the dose of methotrexate from 1500 mg/m2, according to the original regimen, to 1000 mg/m2, the authors designed the modified FAMTX treatment that was evaluated in a prospective Phase II-III randomized trial. Patients with advanced gastric cancer were randomized to receive modified FAMTX treatment or supportive measures only (control group). In the middle of the study, the randomization was interrupted because of strong evidence of benefit in terms of tumor reduction and projected survival in the treatment arm receiving chemotherapy. By the end of the study, 30 assessable patients had received chemotherapy and 10 had received supportive treatment. The overall response rate was 50% (15 patients); 12 patients (40%) had partial responses and 3 (10%) had complete responses (CR). One patient with extensive peritoneal carcinomatosis attained a CR pathologically documented by laparoscopic examination and peritoneal biopsy. The median overall survival time of the treated group was 9 months, whereas that of the control group was only 3 months (P = 0.001). The median overall survival time of the responders was 16 months, and their median remission duration was 8 months. The regimen was well tolerated, with a very acceptable toxicity profile. There was one toxic death resulting from neutropenia and sepsis in a patient who did not receive adequate leucovorin rescue. This regimen appears to prolong survival in patients with advanced gastric cancer, and the reduction of the methotrexate dose does not seem to compromise its efficacy.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                Ther Clin Risk Manag
                Therapeutics and Clinical Risk Management
                Therapeutics and Clinical Risk Management
                Dove Medical Press
                1176-6336
                1178-203X
                October 2008
                October 2008
                : 4
                : 5
                : 999-1007
                Affiliations
                [1 ]Medical Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA, USA;
                [2 ]Gastrointestinal Medical Oncology, M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, USA
                Author notes
                Correspondence: Jaffer A Ajani M.D., Anderson Cancer Center, Unit 426, 1515, Holcombe Blvd., Houston, TX 77030, USA, Tel +1 713 792 2828, Email jajani@ 123456mdanderson.org
                Article
                tcrm-4-999
                2621422
                19209281
                © 2008 Dove Medical Press Limited. All rights reserved
                Categories
                Review

                Medicine

                gastric cancer, chemotherapy, docetaxel, biotherapy

                Comments

                Comment on this article