264
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    4
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: not found
      • Article: not found

      The gender similarities hypothesis.

      American Psychologist
      American Psychological Association (APA)

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisherPubMed
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          The differences model, which argues that males and females are vastly different psychologically, dominates the popular media. Here, the author advances a very different view, the gender similarities hypothesis, which holds that males and females are similar on most, but not all, psychological variables. Results from a review of 46 meta-analyses support the gender similarities hypothesis. Gender differences can vary substantially in magnitude at different ages and depend on the context in which measurement occurs. Overinflated claims of gender differences carry substantial costs in areas such as the workplace and relationships. Copyright (c) 2005 APA, all rights reserved.

          Related collections

          Most cited references53

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: not found
          • Article: not found

          Stereotype Threat and Women's Math Performance

            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: not found

            Magnitude of sex differences in spatial abilities: a meta-analysis and consideration of critical variables.

            In recent years, the magnitude, consistency, and stability across time of cognitive sex differences have been questioned. The present study examined these issues in the context of spatial abilities. A meta-analysis of 286 effect sizes from a variety of spatial ability measures was conducted. Effect sizes were partitioned by the specific test used and by a number of variables related to the experimental procedure in order to achieve homogeneity. Results showed that sex differences are significant in several tests but that some intertest differences exist. Partial support was found for the notion that the magnitude of sex differences has decreased in recent years. Finally, it was found that the age of emergence of sex differences depends on the test used. Results are discussed with regard to their implications for the study of sex differences in spatial abilities.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: not found

              Transformational, transactional, and laissez-faire leadership styles: a meta-analysis comparing women and men.

              A meta-analysis of 45 studies of transformational, transactional, and laissez-faire leadership styles found that female leaders were more transformational than male leaders and also engaged in more of the contingent reward behaviors that are a component of transactional leadership. Male leaders were generally more likely to manifest the other aspects of transactional leadership (active and passive management by exception) and laissez-faire leadership. Although these differences between male and female leaders were small, the implications of these findings are encouraging for female leadership because other research has established that all of the aspects of leadership style on which women exceeded men relate positively to leaders' effectiveness whereas all of the aspects on which men exceeded women have negative or null relations to effectiveness.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                American Psychologist
                American Psychologist
                American Psychological Association (APA)
                1935-990X
                0003-066X
                September 2005
                September 2005
                : 60
                : 6
                : 581-592
                Article
                10.1037/0003-066X.60.6.581
                16173891
                d647febe-5945-4850-81fb-7ba0c4527069
                © 2005
                History

                Comments

                Comment on this article