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      SARS-CoV-2 infection and COVID-19: The lived experience and perceptions of patients in isolation and care in an Australian healthcare setting

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          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          Background

          Isolation and quarantine are key measures in outbreak management and disease control. They are, however, associated with negative patient experiences and outcomes, including an adverse impact on mental health and lower quality of care due to limited interaction with healthcare workers. In this study, we explore the lived experience and perceptions of patients in isolation with COVID-19 in an Australian healthcare setting.

          Methods

          Using a phenomenological approach from a Heideggerian hermeneutical perspective, we conducted individual semi-structured interviews with the first eleven COVID-19 patients admitted to a designated COVID-19 facility in Australia. Interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed verbatim and imported into NVivo 12 for coding and analysis.

          Results

          Participants’ lived experience and perceptions of COVID-19 were represented by five themes: ‘Knowing about COVID-19’, ‘Planning for, and responding to, COVID-19’, ‘Being infected’, ‘Life in isolation and the room’, and ‘Post-discharge life’. Within these, participants conveyed both positive and negative lived experiences of infection, isolation and illness. The contextual aspects of their social and physical environment together with their individual resources contributed to the framing of their planning for, and response to, the outbreak, and were important mediators in their experience.

          Conclusion

          Findings from this study provide a valuable insight into the lived experiences of patients with COVID-19, which reflect those of patients with other infectious diseases who require isolation.

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          Most cited references 16

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          Adverse effects of isolation in hospitalised patients: a systematic review

           C. Abad,  A Fearday,  N Safdar (2010)
          Summary The use of transmission precautions such as contact isolation in patients known to be colonised or infected with multidrug-resistant organisms is recommended in healthcare institutions. Although essential for infection control, contact isolation has recently been associated with adverse effects in patients. We undertook a systematic review to determine whether contact isolation leads to psychological or physical problems for patients. Studies were included if (1) hospitalised patients were placed under isolation precautions for an underlying medical indication, and (2) any adverse events related to the isolation were evaluated. We found 16 studies that reported data regarding the impact of isolation on patient mental well-being, patient satisfaction, patient safety or time spent by healthcare workers in direct patient care. The majority showed a negative impact on patient mental well-being and behaviour, including higher scores for depression, anxiety and anger among isolated patients. A few studies also found that healthcare workers spent less time with patients in isolation. Patient satisfaction was adversely affected by isolation if patients were kept uninformed of their healthcare. Patient safety was also negatively affected, leading to an eight-fold increase in adverse events related to supportive care failures. We found that contact isolation may negatively impact several dimensions of patient care. Well-validated tools are necessary to investigate these results further. Large studies examining a number of safety indicators to assess the adverse effects of isolation are needed. Patient education may be an important step to mitigate the adverse psychological effects of isolation and is recommended.
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            A Qualitative Study on the Psychological Experience of Caregivers of COVID-19 Patients

            Highlights • Studies on the psychological experience of nurses combating COVID-19 are lacking • We investigated the psychological experience of caregivers of COVID-19 patients • Nurses showed interweaving positive/negative emotions during outbreak of COVID-19 • Negative emotions are dominant in the early stages of the COVID-19 outbreak • Coping styles and psychological growth are important for maintaining mental health
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              Barriers and Bridges to Prevention and Control of Dengue: The Need for a Social–Ecological Approach

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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Am J Infect Control
                Am J Infect Control
                American Journal of Infection Control
                Published by Elsevier Inc. on behalf of Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc.
                0196-6553
                1527-3296
                2 September 2020
                2 September 2020
                Affiliations
                [1 ]Marie Bashir Institute for Infectious Diseases and Biosecurity, University of Sydney, Camperdown, NSW, Australia
                [2 ]Susan Wakil School of Nursing and Midwifery, Faculty of Medicine and Health, University of Sydney, Camperdown, NSW, Australia
                [3 ]Department of Infectious Diseases and Sexual Health, Division of Medicine and Cancer Services, Westmead Hospital, Western Sydney Local Health District, Westmead, NSW, Australia
                [4 ]Nursing, Midwifery and Clinical Governance Directorate, Western Sydney Local Health District, Westmead, NSW, Australia
                [5 ]Sydney Medical School, Faculty of Medicine and Health, University of Sydney, Camperdown, NSW, Australia
                [6 ]Westmead Clinical School, Faculty of Medicine and Health, The University of Sydney, Westmead, NSW Australia
                [7 ]Westmead Hospital, Western Sydney Local Health District, Westmead, NSW, Australia
                [8 ]Public Health Unit, Centre for Population Health, Western Sydney Local Health District, North Parramatta, NSW, Australia
                Author notes
                [* ]CORRESPONDING AUTHOR. Professor Ramon Z. Shaban, University of Sydney and Western Sydney Local Health District, Office: 0.4.20, Westmead Institute for Medical Research, 176 Hawkesbury Road, Westmead NSW 21645. Australia. Ph: +61 2 8627 3117; Mobile: +61 478 312 668
                Article
                S0196-6553(20)30837-3
                10.1016/j.ajic.2020.08.032
                7466942
                © 2020 Published by Elsevier Inc. on behalf of Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc.

                Since January 2020 Elsevier has created a COVID-19 resource centre with free information in English and Mandarin on the novel coronavirus COVID-19. The COVID-19 resource centre is hosted on Elsevier Connect, the company's public news and information website. Elsevier hereby grants permission to make all its COVID-19-related research that is available on the COVID-19 resource centre - including this research content - immediately available in PubMed Central and other publicly funded repositories, such as the WHO COVID database with rights for unrestricted research re-use and analyses in any form or by any means with acknowledgement of the original source. These permissions are granted for free by Elsevier for as long as the COVID-19 resource centre remains active.

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