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      SuFMoFPA: A superpixel and meta-heuristic based fuzzy image segmentation approach to explicate COVID-19 radiological images

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      Expert Systems with Applications

      Elsevier BV

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          Correlation of Chest CT and RT-PCR Testing in Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) in China: A Report of 1014 Cases

          Background Chest CT is used for diagnosis of 2019 novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19), as an important complement to the reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) tests. Purpose To investigate the diagnostic value and consistency of chest CT as compared with comparison to RT-PCR assay in COVID-19. Methods From January 6 to February 6, 2020, 1014 patients in Wuhan, China who underwent both chest CT and RT-PCR tests were included. With RT-PCR as reference standard, the performance of chest CT in diagnosing COVID-19 was assessed. Besides, for patients with multiple RT-PCR assays, the dynamic conversion of RT-PCR results (negative to positive, positive to negative, respectively) was analyzed as compared with serial chest CT scans for those with time-interval of 4 days or more. Results Of 1014 patients, 59% (601/1014) had positive RT-PCR results, and 88% (888/1014) had positive chest CT scans. The sensitivity of chest CT in suggesting COVID-19 was 97% (95%CI, 95-98%, 580/601 patients) based on positive RT-PCR results. In patients with negative RT-PCR results, 75% (308/413) had positive chest CT findings; of 308, 48% were considered as highly likely cases, with 33% as probable cases. By analysis of serial RT-PCR assays and CT scans, the mean interval time between the initial negative to positive RT-PCR results was 5.1 ± 1.5 days; the initial positive to subsequent negative RT-PCR result was 6.9 ± 2.3 days). 60% to 93% of cases had initial positive CT consistent with COVID-19 prior (or parallel) to the initial positive RT-PCR results. 42% (24/57) cases showed improvement in follow-up chest CT scans before the RT-PCR results turning negative. Conclusion Chest CT has a high sensitivity for diagnosis of COVID-19. Chest CT may be considered as a primary tool for the current COVID-19 detection in epidemic areas. A translation of this abstract in Farsi is available in the supplement. - ترجمه چکیده این مقاله به فارسی، در ضمیمه موجود است.
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            Sensitivity of Chest CT for COVID-19: Comparison to RT-PCR

            Summary In a series of 51 patients with chest CT and RT-PCR assay performed within 3 days, the sensitivity of CT for COVID-19 infection was 98% compared to RT-PCR sensitivity of 71% (p<.001). Introduction In December 2019, an outbreak of unexplained pneumonia in Wuhan [1] was caused by a new coronavirus infection named COVID-19 (Corona Virus Disease 2019). Noncontrast chest CT may be considered for early diagnosis of viral disease, although viral nucleic acid detection using real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) remains the standard of reference. Chung et al. reported that chest CT may be negative for viral pneumonia of COVID-19 [2] at initial presentation (3/21 patients). Recently, Xie reported 5/167 (3%) patients who had negative RT-PCR for COVID-19 at initial presentation despite chest CT findings typical of viral pneumonia [3]. The purpose of this study was to compare the sensitivity of chest CT and viral nucleic acid assay at initial patient presentation. Materials and Methods The retrospective analysis was approved by institutional review board and patient consent was waived. Patients at Taizhou Enze Medical Center (Group) Enze Hospital were evaluated from January 19, 2020 to February 4, 2020. During this period, chest CT and RT-PCR (Shanghai ZJ Bio-Tech Co, Ltd, Shanghai, China) was performed for consecutive patients who presented with a history of 1) travel or residential history in Wuhan or local endemic areas or contact with individuals with individuals with fever or respiratory symptoms from these areas within 14 days and 2) had fever or acute respiratory symptoms of unknown cause. In the case of an initial negative RT-PCR test, repeat testing was performed at intervals of 1 day or more. Of these patients, we included all patients who had both noncontrast chest CT scan (slice thickness, 5mm) and RT-PCR testing within an interval of 3 days or less and who had an eventual confirmed diagnosis of COVID-19 infection by RT-PCR testing (Figure 1). Typical and atypical chest CT findings were recorded according to CT features previously described for COVD-19 (4,5). The detection rate of COVID-19 infection based on the initial chest CT and RT-PCR was compared. Statistical analysis was performed using McNemar Chi-squared test with significance at the p <.05 level. Figure 1: Flowchart for patient inclusion. Results 51 patients (29 men and 22 women) were included with median age of 45 (interquartile range, 39- 55) years. All patients had throat swab (45 patients) or sputum samples (6 patients) followed by one or more RT-PCR assays. The average time from initial disease onset to CT was 3 +/- 3 days; the average time from initial disease onset to RT-PCR testing was 3 +/- 3 days. 36/51 patients had initial positive RT-PCR for COVID-19. 12/51 patients had COVID-19 confirmed by two RT-PCR nucleic acid tests (1 to 2 days), 2 patients by three tests (2-5 days) and 1 patient by four tests (7 days) after initial onset. 50/51 (98%) patients had evidence of abnormal CT compatible with viral pneumonia at baseline while one patient had a normal CT. Of 50 patients with abnormal CT, 36 (72%) had typical CT manifestations (e.g. peripheral, subpleural ground glass opacities, often in the lower lobes (Figure 2) and 14 (28%) had atypical CT manifestations (Figure 3) [2]. In this patient sample, difference in detection rate for initial CT (50/51 [98%, 95% CI 90-100%]) patients was greater than first RT-PCR (36/51 [71%, 95%CI 56-83%]) patients (p<.001). Figure 2a: Examples of typical chest CT findings compatible with COVID-19 pneumonia in patients with epidemiological and clinical presentation suspicious for COVID-19 infection. A, male, 74 years old with fever and cough for 5 days. Axial chest CT shows bilateral subpleural ground glass opacities (GGO). B, female, 55 years old, with fever and cough for 7 days. Axial chest CT shows extensive bilateral ground glass opacities and consolidation; C, male, 43 years old, presenting with fever and cough for 1 week. Axial chest CT shows small bilateral areas of peripheral GGO with minimal consolidation; D, female, 43 years old presenting with fever with cough for 5 days. Axial chest CT shows a right lung region of peripheral consolidation. Figure 2b: Examples of typical chest CT findings compatible with COVID-19 pneumonia in patients with epidemiological and clinical presentation suspicious for COVID-19 infection. A, male, 74 years old with fever and cough for 5 days. Axial chest CT shows bilateral subpleural ground glass opacities (GGO). B, female, 55 years old, with fever and cough for 7 days. Axial chest CT shows extensive bilateral ground glass opacities and consolidation; C, male, 43 years old, presenting with fever and cough for 1 week. Axial chest CT shows small bilateral areas of peripheral GGO with minimal consolidation; D, female, 43 years old presenting with fever with cough for 5 days. Axial chest CT shows a right lung region of peripheral consolidation. Figure 2c: Examples of typical chest CT findings compatible with COVID-19 pneumonia in patients with epidemiological and clinical presentation suspicious for COVID-19 infection. A, male, 74 years old with fever and cough for 5 days. Axial chest CT shows bilateral subpleural ground glass opacities (GGO). B, female, 55 years old, with fever and cough for 7 days. Axial chest CT shows extensive bilateral ground glass opacities and consolidation; C, male, 43 years old, presenting with fever and cough for 1 week. Axial chest CT shows small bilateral areas of peripheral GGO with minimal consolidation; D, female, 43 years old presenting with fever with cough for 5 days. Axial chest CT shows a right lung region of peripheral consolidation. Figure 2d: Examples of typical chest CT findings compatible with COVID-19 pneumonia in patients with epidemiological and clinical presentation suspicious for COVID-19 infection. A, male, 74 years old with fever and cough for 5 days. Axial chest CT shows bilateral subpleural ground glass opacities (GGO). B, female, 55 years old, with fever and cough for 7 days. Axial chest CT shows extensive bilateral ground glass opacities and consolidation; C, male, 43 years old, presenting with fever and cough for 1 week. Axial chest CT shows small bilateral areas of peripheral GGO with minimal consolidation; D, female, 43 years old presenting with fever with cough for 5 days. Axial chest CT shows a right lung region of peripheral consolidation. Figure 3a: Examples of chest CT findings less commonly reported in COVID-19 infection (atypical) in patients with epidemiological and clinical presentation suspicious for COVID-19 infection. A, male, 36 years old with cough for 3 days. Axial chest CT shows a small focal and central ground glass opacity (GGO) in the right upper lobe; B, female, 40 years old. Axial chest CT shows small peripheral linear opacities bilaterally. C, male, 38 years old. Axial chest CT shows a GGO in the central left lower lobe; D, male, 31 years old with fever for 1 day. Axial chest CT shows a linear opacity in the left lower lateral mid lung. Figure 3b: Examples of chest CT findings less commonly reported in COVID-19 infection (atypical) in patients with epidemiological and clinical presentation suspicious for COVID-19 infection. A, male, 36 years old with cough for 3 days. Axial chest CT shows a small focal and central ground glass opacity (GGO) in the right upper lobe; B, female, 40 years old. Axial chest CT shows small peripheral linear opacities bilaterally. C, male, 38 years old. Axial chest CT shows a GGO in the central left lower lobe; D, male, 31 years old with fever for 1 day. Axial chest CT shows a linear opacity in the left lower lateral mid lung. Figure 3c: Examples of chest CT findings less commonly reported in COVID-19 infection (atypical) in patients with epidemiological and clinical presentation suspicious for COVID-19 infection. A, male, 36 years old with cough for 3 days. Axial chest CT shows a small focal and central ground glass opacity (GGO) in the right upper lobe; B, female, 40 years old. Axial chest CT shows small peripheral linear opacities bilaterally. C, male, 38 years old. Axial chest CT shows a GGO in the central left lower lobe; D, male, 31 years old with fever for 1 day. Axial chest CT shows a linear opacity in the left lower lateral mid lung. Figure 3d: Examples of chest CT findings less commonly reported in COVID-19 infection (atypical) in patients with epidemiological and clinical presentation suspicious for COVID-19 infection. A, male, 36 years old with cough for 3 days. Axial chest CT shows a small focal and central ground glass opacity (GGO) in the right upper lobe; B, female, 40 years old. Axial chest CT shows small peripheral linear opacities bilaterally. C, male, 38 years old. Axial chest CT shows a GGO in the central left lower lobe; D, male, 31 years old with fever for 1 day. Axial chest CT shows a linear opacity in the left lower lateral mid lung. Discussion In our series, the sensitivity of chest CT was greater than that of RT-PCR (98% vs 71%, respectively, p<.001). The reasons for the low efficiency of viral nucleic acid detection may include: 1) immature development of nucleic acid detection technology; 2) variation in detection rate from different manufacturers; 3) low patient viral load; or 4) improper clinical sampling. The reasons for the relatively lower RT-PCR detection rate in our sample compared to a prior report are unknown (3). Our results support the use of chest CT for screening for COVD-19 for patients with clinical and epidemiologic features compatible with COVID-19 infection particularly when RT-PCR testing is negative.
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              Chest CT Findings in Coronavirus Disease-19 (COVID-19): Relationship to Duration of Infection

              Abstract In this retrospective study, chest CTs of 121 symptomatic patients infected with coronavirus disease-19 (COVID-19) from four centers in China from January 18, 2020 to February 2, 2020 were reviewed for common CT findings in relationship to the time between symptom onset and the initial CT scan (i.e. early, 0-2 days (36 patients), intermediate 3-5 days (33 patients), late 6-12 days (25 patients)). The hallmarks of COVID-19 infection on imaging were bilateral and peripheral ground-glass and consolidative pulmonary opacities. Notably, 20/36 (56%) of early patients had a normal CT. With a longer time after the onset of symptoms, CT findings were more frequent, including consolidation, bilateral and peripheral disease, greater total lung involvement, linear opacities, “crazy-paving” pattern and the “reverse halo” sign. Bilateral lung involvement was observed in 10/36 early patients (28%), 25/33 intermediate patients (76%), and 22/25 late patients (88%).
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                Journal
                Expert Systems with Applications
                Expert Systems with Applications
                Elsevier BV
                09574174
                April 2021
                April 2021
                : 167
                : 114142
                Article
                10.1016/j.eswa.2020.114142
                © 2021

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