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      LOCALIZER: subcellular localization prediction of both plant and effector proteins in the plant cell

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          Abstract

          Pathogens secrete effector proteins and many operate inside plant cells to enable infection. Some effectors have been found to enter subcellular compartments by mimicking host targeting sequences. Although many computational methods exist to predict plant protein subcellular localization, they perform poorly for effectors. We introduce LOCALIZER for predicting plant and effector protein localization to chloroplasts, mitochondria, and nuclei. LOCALIZER shows greater prediction accuracy for chloroplast and mitochondrial targeting compared to other methods for 652 plant proteins. For 107 eukaryotic effectors, LOCALIZER outperforms other methods and predicts a previously unrecognized chloroplast transit peptide for the ToxA effector, which we show translocates into tobacco chloroplasts. Secretome-wide predictions and confocal microscopy reveal that rust fungi might have evolved multiple effectors that target chloroplasts or nuclei. LOCALIZER is the first method for predicting effector localisation in plants and is a valuable tool for prioritizing effector candidates for functional investigations. LOCALIZER is available at http://localizer.csiro.au/.

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          Most cited references 61

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          Predicting transmembrane protein topology with a hidden Markov model: application to complete genomes.

          We describe and validate a new membrane protein topology prediction method, TMHMM, based on a hidden Markov model. We present a detailed analysis of TMHMM's performance, and show that it correctly predicts 97-98 % of the transmembrane helices. Additionally, TMHMM can discriminate between soluble and membrane proteins with both specificity and sensitivity better than 99 %, although the accuracy drops when signal peptides are present. This high degree of accuracy allowed us to predict reliably integral membrane proteins in a large collection of genomes. Based on these predictions, we estimate that 20-30 % of all genes in most genomes encode membrane proteins, which is in agreement with previous estimates. We further discovered that proteins with N(in)-C(in) topologies are strongly preferred in all examined organisms, except Caenorhabditis elegans, where the large number of 7TM receptors increases the counts for N(out)-C(in) topologies. We discuss the possible relevance of this finding for our understanding of membrane protein assembly mechanisms. A TMHMM prediction service is available at http://www.cbs.dtu.dk/services/TMHMM/. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.
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            SignalP 4.0: discriminating signal peptides from transmembrane regions.

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              Improved prediction of signal peptides: SignalP 3.0.

              We describe improvements of the currently most popular method for prediction of classically secreted proteins, SignalP. SignalP consists of two different predictors based on neural network and hidden Markov model algorithms, where both components have been updated. Motivated by the idea that the cleavage site position and the amino acid composition of the signal peptide are correlated, new features have been included as input to the neural network. This addition, combined with a thorough error-correction of a new data set, have improved the performance of the predictor significantly over SignalP version 2. In version 3, correctness of the cleavage site predictions has increased notably for all three organism groups, eukaryotes, Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. The accuracy of cleavage site prediction has increased in the range 6-17% over the previous version, whereas the signal peptide discrimination improvement is mainly due to the elimination of false-positive predictions, as well as the introduction of a new discrimination score for the neural network. The new method has been benchmarked against other available methods. Predictions can be made at the publicly available web server
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Sci Rep
                Sci Rep
                Scientific Reports
                Nature Publishing Group
                2045-2322
                16 March 2017
                2017
                : 7
                Affiliations
                [1 ]Centre for Environment and Life Sciences, CSIRO Agriculture and Food , Perth, WA, Australia
                [2 ]Division of Plant Sciences, Research School of Biology, The Australian National University , Acton, ACT, Australia
                [3 ]The UWA Institute of Agriculture, The University of Western Australia , Crawley, WA, Australia
                [4 ]The Sainsbury Laboratory, Norwich Research Park , Norwich, United Kingdom
                [5 ]Queensland Bioscience Precinct, CSIRO Agriculture and Food , Brisbane, QLD, Australia
                [6 ]Black Mountain Laboratories, CSIRO Agriculture and Food , Canberra, ACT, Australia
                Author notes
                Article
                srep44598
                10.1038/srep44598
                5353544
                28300209
                Copyright © 2017, The Author(s)

                This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in the credit line; if the material is not included under the Creative Commons license, users will need to obtain permission from the license holder to reproduce the material. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

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