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      Somatic CRISPR–Cas9-induced mutations reveal roles of embryonically essential dynein chains in Caenorhabditis elegans cilia

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      The Journal of Cell Biology
      The Rockefeller University Press

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          Abstract

          CRISPR–Cas9-induced mutations in intraflagellar transport (IFT) motors reveal that IFT-specific dynein and cytoplasmic dynein have unique compositions but share components and regulatory mechanisms.

          Abstract

          Cilium formation and maintenance require intraflagellar transport (IFT). Although much is known about kinesin-2–driven anterograde IFT, the composition and regulation of retrograde IFT-specific dynein remain elusive. Components of cytoplasmic dynein may participate in IFT; however, their essential roles in cell division preclude functional studies in postmitotic cilia. Here, we report that inducible expression of the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)–Cas9 system in Caenorhabditis elegans generated conditional mutations in IFT motors and particles, recapitulating ciliary defects in their null mutants. Using this method to bypass the embryonic requirement, we show the following: the dynein intermediate chain, light chain LC8, and lissencephaly-1 regulate retrograde IFT; the dynein light intermediate chain functions in dendrites and indirectly contributes to ciliogenesis; and the Tctex and Roadblock light chains are dispensable for cilium assembly. Furthermore, we demonstrate that these components undergo biphasic IFT with distinct transport frequencies and turnaround behaviors. Together, our results suggest that IFT–dynein and cytoplasmic dynein have unique compositions but also share components and regulatory mechanisms.

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          Most cited references23

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          Efficient gene transfer in C.elegans: extrachromosomal maintenance and integration of transforming sequences.

          We describe a dominant behavioral marker, rol-6(su-1006), and an efficient microinjection procedure which facilitate the recovery of Caenorhabditis elegans transformants. We use these tools to study the mechanism of C.elegans DNA transformation. By injecting mixtures of genetically marked DNA molecules, we show that large extrachromosomal arrays assemble directly from the injected molecules and that homologous recombination drives array assembly. Appropriately placed double-strand breaks stimulated homologous recombination during array formation. Our data indicate that the size of the assembled transgenic structures determines whether or not they will be maintained extrachromosomally or lost. We show that low copy number extrachromosomal transformation can be achieved by adjusting the relative concentration of DNA molecules in the injection mixture. Integration of the injected DNA, though relatively rare, was reproducibly achieved when single-stranded oligonucleotide was co-injected with the double-stranded DNA.
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            Regulators of the cytoplasmic dynein motor.

            Eukaryotic cells use cytoskeletal motor proteins to transport many different intracellular cargos. Numerous kinesins and myosins have evolved to cope with the various transport needs that have arisen during eukaryotic evolution. Surprisingly, a single cytoplasmic dynein (a minus end-directed microtubule motor) carries out similarly diverse transport activities as the many different types of kinesin. How is dynein coupled to its wide range of cargos and how is it spatially and temporally regulated? The answer could lie in the several multifunctional adaptors, including dynactin, lissencephaly 1, nuclear distribution protein E (NUDE) and NUDE-like, Bicaudal D, Rod-ZW10-Zwilch and Spindly, that regulate dynein function and localization.
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              Functions and mechanics of dynein motor proteins.

              Fuelled by ATP hydrolysis, dyneins generate force and movement on microtubules in a wealth of biological processes, including ciliary beating, cell division and intracellular transport. The large mass and complexity of dynein motors have made elucidating their mechanisms a sizable task. Yet, through a combination of approaches, including X-ray crystallography, cryo-electron microscopy, single-molecule assays and biochemical experiments, important progress has been made towards understanding how these giant motor proteins work. From these studies, a model for the mechanochemical cycle of dynein is emerging, in which nucleotide-driven flexing motions within the AAA+ ring of dynein alter the affinity of its microtubule-binding stalk and reshape its mechanical element to generate movement.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                J Cell Biol
                J. Cell Biol
                jcb
                jcb
                The Journal of Cell Biology
                The Rockefeller University Press
                0021-9525
                1540-8140
                16 March 2015
                : 208
                : 6
                : 683-692
                Affiliations
                Tsinghua-Peking Center for Life Sciences, School of Life Sciences, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, China
                Author notes
                Correspondence to Guangshuo Ou: guangshuo.ou@ 123456gmail.com
                [*]

                W. Li and P. Yi contributed equally to this paper.

                Article
                201411041
                10.1083/jcb.201411041
                4362450
                25778918
                d69262ee-1950-4c33-a011-f4eec246814f
                © 2015 Li et al.

                This article is distributed under the terms of an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike–No Mirror Sites license for the first six months after the publication date (see http://www.rupress.org/terms). After six months it is available under a Creative Commons License (Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported license, as described at http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/).

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