1
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: found
      Is Open Access

      Mo xW x–1S 2 Nanotubes for Advanced Field Emission Application

      Read this article at

      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          Transition metal dichalcogenide (TMDC) nanotubes complement the field of low‐dimensional materials with their quasi‐1D morphology and a wide set of intriguing properties. By introducing different transition metals into the crystal structure, their properties can be tailored for specific purpose and applications. Herein, the characterization and a subsequent preparation of single‐nanotube field emission devices of Mo xW x‐1S 2 nanotubes prepared via the chemical vapor transport reaction is presented. Energy‐dispersive X‐ray spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and X‐ray diffraction  indicate that the molybdenum and tungsten atoms are randomly distributed within the crystal structure and that the material is highly crystalline. High resolution transmission electron microscopy  and electron diffraction (ED) patterns further corroborate these findings. A detailed analysis of the ED patterns from an eight‐layer nanotube reveal that the nanotubes grow in the 2H structure, with each shell consists of one bilayer. The work function of the nanotubes is comparable to that of pure MoS 2 and lower of pure WS 2 NTs, making them ideal candidates for field emission applications. Two devices with different geometrical setup are prepared and tested as field emitters, showing promising results for single nanotube field emission applications.

          Related collections

          Most cited references51

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          Single-layer MoS2 transistors.

          Two-dimensional materials are attractive for use in next-generation nanoelectronic devices because, compared to one-dimensional materials, it is relatively easy to fabricate complex structures from them. The most widely studied two-dimensional material is graphene, both because of its rich physics and its high mobility. However, pristine graphene does not have a bandgap, a property that is essential for many applications, including transistors. Engineering a graphene bandgap increases fabrication complexity and either reduces mobilities to the level of strained silicon films or requires high voltages. Although single layers of MoS(2) have a large intrinsic bandgap of 1.8 eV (ref. 16), previously reported mobilities in the 0.5-3 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) range are too low for practical devices. Here, we use a halfnium oxide gate dielectric to demonstrate a room-temperature single-layer MoS(2) mobility of at least 200 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1), similar to that of graphene nanoribbons, and demonstrate transistors with room-temperature current on/off ratios of 1 × 10(8) and ultralow standby power dissipation. Because monolayer MoS(2) has a direct bandgap, it can be used to construct interband tunnel FETs, which offer lower power consumption than classical transistors. Monolayer MoS(2) could also complement graphene in applications that require thin transparent semiconductors, such as optoelectronics and energy harvesting.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: not found
            • Article: not found

            Atomically Thin\({\mathrm{MoS}}_{2}\): A New Direct-Gap Semiconductor

              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: not found

              Two-dimensional atomic crystals

              We report free-standing atomic crystals that are strictly 2D and can be viewed as individual atomic planes pulled out of bulk crystals or as unrolled single-wall nanotubes. By using micromechanical cleavage, we have prepared and studied a variety of 2D crystals including single layers of boron nitride, graphite, several dichalcogenides, and complex oxides. These atomically thin sheets (essentially gigantic 2D molecules unprotected from the immediate environment) are stable under ambient conditions, exhibit high crystal quality, and are continuous on a macroscopic scale.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Contributors
                (View ORCID Profile)
                (View ORCID Profile)
                (View ORCID Profile)
                (View ORCID Profile)
                Journal
                Advanced Functional Materials
                Adv Funct Materials
                Wiley
                1616-301X
                1616-3028
                April 2023
                January 22 2023
                April 2023
                : 33
                : 15
                Affiliations
                [1 ] Department of Condensed Matter Physics Jozef Stefan Institute Jamova cesta 39 Ljubljana 1000 Slovenia
                [2 ] Department of Electrochemical Materials J. Heyrovsky Institute of Physical Chemistry Dolejskova 3 182 23 Prague 8 Czech Republic
                [3 ] Faculty of Applied Natural Sciences and Cultural Studies OTH Regensburg Seybothstraße 2 93053 Regensburg Germany
                [4 ] Institute of Physics Belgrade University of Belgrade Pregrevica 118 Belgrade 11080 Serbia
                Article
                10.1002/adfm.202213869
                d6968dc5-317e-460c-9243-28b36c64f95d
                © 2023

                http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

                History

                Comments

                Comment on this article