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      Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus and Celiac Disease: Distinct Autoimmune Disorders That Share Common Pathogenic Mechanisms

      *

      Hormone Research in Paediatrics

      S. Karger AG

      Diabetes, Celiac disease, Autoimmunity, Human lymphocyte antigens, Environment, Microbiome

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          Abstract

          Background: The relatively common co-occurrence of type 1 diabetes (T1D) and celiac disease (CD) suggests these disorders share common pathogenic etiologies. Summary: T1D and CD are strongly linked to closely related high-risk human lymphocyte antigens (HLA-DR-DQ). High-risk HLA molecules bind specific fragments of gluten or the islet self-antigen(s) and present these antigens to antigen-responsive T cells. In an appropriate proinflammatory environment, the autoimmune response results in destruction of the intestinal enterocyte and/or the pancreatic beta cell. Environmental factors have been implicated in the etiology of T1D and CD because (1) identical twins are only partially concordant for these disorders and (2) incidence rates of T1D and CD have been steadily rising for decades. Prospective studies in infants genetically predisposed to T1D and CD showed that antibody positivity to both disorders begins in the first 1–3 years of life. Viral infections and early exposure to gluten or cow’s milk in the infant diet have been implicated in disease pathogenesis. However, delaying introduction of gluten in the infant diet until 12 months of age had no impact on the development of islet or celiac autoimmunity. Weaning nursing infants to hydrolyzed infant formula had no impact on the development of T1D. Viral infections have been suspected of playing a role in T1D pathogenesis for decades. A large international prospective study (TEDDY) has shown increased risk of T1D autoimmunity particularly when >5 respiratory infections or febrile infections have occurred in the 9 months preceding the appearance of islet antibodies. Provocative data in animal models of T1D suggest the microbiome may play an important role in the pathogenesis of T1D. Breastfeeding, diet, infections, antibiotics, and method of birth alter the composition of the microbiome. Human data indicate subtle differences in the microbiome of children with T1D autoimmunity, while intestinal dysbiosis has been clearly demonstrated in CD. Alterations of the integrity of the intestinal mucosa plays an important role in the pathogenesis of CD, and the NOD mouse model suggests an important role of a leaky intestinal epithelium in T1D as well. Key Message: Immunogenetics and the environment are closely interrelated in the pathogenesis of T1D and CD. Large well-designed prospective studies in at-risk populations informed by scientifically rigorous studies in animal models are likely to have the greatest impact on our understanding of the complex pathogenesis of these detrimental autoimmune disorders.

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          Most cited references 31

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          Expanded T cells from pancreatic lymph nodes of type 1 diabetic subjects recognize an insulin epitope.

          In autoimmune type 1 diabetes, pathogenic T lymphocytes are associated with the specific destruction of insulin-producing beta-islet cells. Identification of the autoantigens involved in triggering this process is a central question. Here we examined T cells from pancreatic draining lymph nodes, the site of islet-cell-specific self-antigen presentation. We cloned single T cells in a non-biased manner from pancreatic draining lymph nodes of subjects with type 1 diabetes and from non-diabetic controls. A high degree of T-cell clonal expansion was observed in pancreatic lymph nodes from long-term diabetic patients but not from control subjects. The oligoclonally expanded T cells from diabetic subjects with DR4, a susceptibility allele for type 1 diabetes, recognized the insulin A 1-15 epitope restricted by DR4. These results identify insulin-reactive, clonally expanded T cells from the site of autoinflammatory drainage in long-term type 1 diabetics, indicating that insulin may indeed be the target antigen causing autoimmune diabetes.
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            Primary Dietary Intervention Study to Reduce the Risk of Islet Autoimmunity in Children at Increased Risk for Type 1 Diabetes

            OBJECTIVE To determine whether delaying the introduction of gluten in infants with a genetic risk of islet autoimmunity is feasible, safe, and may reduce the risk of type 1 diabetes–associated islet autoimmunity. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS A total of 150 infants with a first-degree family history of type 1 diabetes and a risk HLA genotype were randomly assigned to a first gluten exposure at age 6 months (control group) or 12 months (late-exposure group) and were followed 3 monthly until the age of 3 years and yearly thereafter for safety (for growth and autoantibodies to transglutaminase C [TGCAs]), islet autoantibodies to insulin, GAD, insulinoma-associated protein 2, and type 1 diabetes. RESULTS Adherence to the dietary-intervention protocol was reported from 70% of families. During the first 3 years, weight and height were similar in children in the control and late-exposure groups, as was the probability of developing TGCAs (14 vs. 4%; P = 0.1). Eleven children in the control group and 13 children in the late-exposure group developed islet autoantibodies (3-year risk: 12 vs. 13%; P = 0.6). Seven children developed diabetes, including four in the late-exposure group. No significant differences were observed when children were analyzed as per protocol on the basis of the reported first gluten exposure of the children. CONCLUSIONS Delaying gluten exposure until the age of 12 months is safe but does not substantially reduce the risk for islet autoimmunity in genetically at-risk children.
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              Endocrine self and gut non-self intersect in the pancreatic lymph nodes.

              The autoimmune cascade that culminates in diabetes initiates within pancreatic lymph nodes (PLNs). Here, we show that developmentally controlled lymphogenesis establishes a preferential trafficking route from the gut to the PLN, where T cells can be activated by antigens drained from the peritoneum and the gastrointestinal tract. Furthermore, intestinal stress modifies the presentation of pancreatic self-antigens in PLNs. The convergence of endocrine and intestinal contents within PLNs has significant implications for type 1 diabetes and may help to explain the link between autoimmune pathogenesis and environmental provocation.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                HRP
                Horm Res Paediatr
                10.1159/issn.1663-2818
                Hormone Research in Paediatrics
                S. Karger AG
                1663-2818
                1663-2826
                2019
                April 2020
                08 October 2019
                : 92
                : 5
                : 285-292
                Affiliations
                Division of Endocrinology, Department of Pediatrics, Boston Children’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA
                Author notes
                *Gregory Goodwin, Division of Endocrinology, Boston Children’s Hospital, 300 Longwood Ave, Boston, MA 02115 (USA), E-Mail Gregory.goodwin@childrens.harvard.edu
                Article
                503142 Horm Res Paediatr 2019;92:285–292
                10.1159/000503142
                31593953
                © 2019 S. Karger AG, Basel

                Copyright: All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be translated into other languages, reproduced or utilized in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, microcopying, or by any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the publisher. Drug Dosage: The authors and the publisher have exerted every effort to ensure that drug selection and dosage set forth in this text are in accord with current recommendations and practice at the time of publication. However, in view of ongoing research, changes in government regulations, and the constant flow of information relating to drug therapy and drug reactions, the reader is urged to check the package insert for each drug for any changes in indications and dosage and for added warnings and precautions. This is particularly important when the recommended agent is a new and/or infrequently employed drug. Disclaimer: The statements, opinions and data contained in this publication are solely those of the individual authors and contributors and not of the publishers and the editor(s). The appearance of advertisements or/and product references in the publication is not a warranty, endorsement, or approval of the products or services advertised or of their effectiveness, quality or safety. The publisher and the editor(s) disclaim responsibility for any injury to persons or property resulting from any ideas, methods, instructions or products referred to in the content or advertisements.

                Page count
                Figures: 5, Pages: 8
                Categories
                Mini Review Article

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