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      Perimenopausal giant hydatidiform mole complicated with preeclampsia and hyperthyroidism: A case report and literature review

      case-report

      , , ,

      Open Medicine

      De Gruyter

      giant hydatidiform mole, perimenopausal, preeclampsia, hyperthyroidism

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          Abstract

          Gestational trophoblastic disease (GTD) commonly occurs in reproductive females, but is extremely rare in perimenopausal females. In this study, we reported a case of hydatidiform mole in a 48-year-old perimenopausal female admitted due to a giant uterine mass of 28 weeks’ gestational size. The serum human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG) level ranged from 944 to 1,286 mIU/mL before treatments. The signs of preeclampsia and hyperthyroidism were relatively prominent. Hysterectomy was performed and chemotherapy was scheduled when the serum HCG level remained at a plateau, about 528 mIU/mL. The symptoms of preeclampsia and hyperthyroidism were relieved after treatment. Accordingly, we concluded that GTD could occur in perimenopausal woman and hysterectomy usually is the optimal treatment.

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          Most cited references 19

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          Diagnosis and management of hypertension in pregnancy: summary of updated NICE guidance

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            Prophylactic chemotherapy for hydatidiform mole to prevent gestational trophoblastic neoplasia.

             Qiuyi Wang,  Jing Fu (corresponding) ,  Lina Hu (2017)
            This is an update of the original Cochrane Review published in Cochrane Library, Issue 10, 2012.Hydatidiform mole (HM), also called a molar pregnancy, is characterised by an overgrowth of foetal chorionic tissue within the uterus. HMs may be partial (PM) or complete (CM) depending on their gross appearance, histopathology and karyotype. PMs usually have a triploid karyotype, derived from maternal and paternal origins, whereas CMs are diploid and have paternal origins only. Most women with HM can be cured by evacuation of retained products of conception (ERPC) and their fertility preserved. However, in some women the growth persists and develops into gestational trophoblastic neoplasia (GTN), a malignant form of the disease that requires treatment with chemotherapy. CMs have a higher rate of malignant transformation than PMs. It may be possible to reduce the risk of GTN in women with HM by administering prophylactic chemotherapy (P-Chem). However, P-Chem given before or after evacuation of HM to prevent malignant sequelae remains controversial, as the risks and benefits of this practice are unclear.
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              Invasive mole in a postmenopausal woman.

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                Author and article information

                Contributors
                Journal
                Open Med (Wars)
                Open Med (Wars)
                med
                Open Medicine
                De Gruyter
                2391-5463
                10 July 2021
                2021
                : 16
                : 1
                : 1038-1042
                Affiliations
                Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Beijing Friendship Hospital, Capital Medical University , Beijing 100050, China
                Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Tsinghua University , Beijing 100016, China
                Author notes
                tel: +86-010-63138382, fax: +86-010-63138382
                Article
                med-2021-0315
                10.1515/med-2021-0315
                8276328
                34286100
                d6b69bd3-01ef-4176-8a3d-c6065f8faed0
                © 2021 Yan Wan et al., published by De Gruyter

                This work is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.

                Page count
                Pages: 5
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                Case Report

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