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      Healthcare providers’ knowledge, readiness, prescribing behaviors, and perceived barriers regarding routine HIV testing and pre-exposure prophylaxis in DeLand, Florida

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          Abstract

          Objectives:

          Florida ranks highest in the United States among newly diagnosed HIV infections. This ranking reflects the need for investigation of healthcare providers’ knowledge, readiness, prescribing behaviors, and perceived barriers to routine HIV testing and pre-exposure prophylaxis.

          Methods:

          We adapted national questionnaires with questions co-developed with Florida Department of Health to form a 25-item instrument. Questionnaires were distributed to the population of eligible healthcare providers in DeLand, Florida.

          Results:

          Results from an approximate 20% response rate that encompasses 12 providers demonstrate baseline findings to inform future studies. For example, 75% of respondents were aware of FL Administrative Code 64D-3.042 that pregnant women should receive HIV testing during first and third trimesters. However, 50% of respondents rarely or never offer tests to pregnant women according to practice guidelines. About 75% of respondents strongly agree or agree with willingness to prescribe pre-exposure prophylaxis to high-risk patients, yet 8.3% always or very often prescribe pre-exposure prophylaxis.

          Conclusions:

          Results convey the importance of and need for greater collaboration between providers and the Florida Department of Health to enhance providers’ knowledge, readiness, and, ultimately, behaviors regarding routine HIV testing and pre-exposure prophylaxis prescription.

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          Most cited references 44

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          Preexposure chemoprophylaxis for HIV prevention in men who have sex with men.

          Antiretroviral chemoprophylaxis before exposure is a promising approach for the prevention of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) acquisition. We randomly assigned 2499 HIV-seronegative men or transgender women who have sex with men to receive a combination of two oral antiretroviral drugs, emtricitabine and tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (FTC-TDF), or placebo once daily. All subjects received HIV testing, risk-reduction counseling, condoms, and management of sexually transmitted infections. The study subjects were followed for 3324 person-years (median, 1.2 years; maximum, 2.8 years). Of these subjects, 10 were found to have been infected with HIV at enrollment, and 100 became infected during follow-up (36 in the FTC-TDF group and 64 in the placebo group), indicating a 44% reduction in the incidence of HIV (95% confidence interval, 15 to 63; P=0.005). In the FTC-TDF group, the study drug was detected in 22 of 43 of seronegative subjects (51%) and in 3 of 34 HIV-infected subjects (9%) (P<0.001). Nausea was reported more frequently during the first 4 weeks in the FTC-TDF group than in the placebo group (P<0.001). The two groups had similar rates of serious adverse events (P=0.57). Oral FTC-TDF provided protection against the acquisition of HIV infection among the subjects. Detectable blood levels strongly correlated with the prophylactic effect. (Funded by the National Institutes of Health and the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation; ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00458393.).
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            Antiretroviral prophylaxis for HIV prevention in heterosexual men and women.

            Antiretroviral preexposure prophylaxis is a promising approach for preventing human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection in heterosexual populations. We conducted a randomized trial of oral antiretroviral therapy for use as preexposure prophylaxis among HIV-1-serodiscordant heterosexual couples from Kenya and Uganda. The HIV-1-seronegative partner in each couple was randomly assigned to one of three study regimens--once-daily tenofovir (TDF), combination tenofovir-emtricitabine (TDF-FTC), or matching placebo--and followed monthly for up to 36 months. At enrollment, the HIV-1-seropositive partners were not eligible for antiretroviral therapy, according to national guidelines. All couples received standard HIV-1 treatment and prevention services. We enrolled 4758 couples, of whom 4747 were followed: 1584 randomly assigned to TDF, 1579 to TDF-FTC, and 1584 to placebo. For 62% of the couples followed, the HIV-1-seronegative partner was male. Among HIV-1-seropositive participants, the median CD4 count was 495 cells per cubic millimeter (interquartile range, 375 to 662). A total of 82 HIV-1 infections occurred in seronegative participants during the study, 17 in the TDF group (incidence, 0.65 per 100 person-years), 13 in the TDF-FTC group (incidence, 0.50 per 100 person-years), and 52 in the placebo group (incidence, 1.99 per 100 person-years), indicating a relative reduction of 67% in the incidence of HIV-1 with TDF (95% confidence interval [CI], 44 to 81; P<0.001) and of 75% with TDF-FTC (95% CI, 55 to 87; P<0.001). Protective effects of TDF-FTC and TDF alone against HIV-1 were not significantly different (P=0.23), and both study medications significantly reduced the HIV-1 incidence among both men and women. The rate of serious adverse events was similar across the study groups. Eight participants receiving active treatment were found to have been infected with HIV-1 at baseline, and among these eight, antiretroviral resistance developed in two during the study. Oral TDF and TDF-FTC both protect against HIV-1 infection in heterosexual men and women. (Funded by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation; Partners PrEP ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00557245.).
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              • Article: not found

              Antiretroviral preexposure prophylaxis for heterosexual HIV transmission in Botswana.

              Preexposure prophylaxis with antiretroviral agents has been shown to reduce the transmission of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) among men who have sex with men; however, the efficacy among heterosexuals is uncertain. We randomly assigned HIV-seronegative men and women to receive either tenofovir disoproxil fumarate and emtricitabine (TDF-FTC) or matching placebo once daily. Monthly study visits were scheduled, and participants received a comprehensive package of prevention services, including HIV testing, counseling on adherence to medication, management of sexually transmitted infections, monitoring for adverse events, and individualized counseling on risk reduction; bone mineral density testing was performed semiannually in a subgroup of participants. A total of 1219 men and women underwent randomization (45.7% women) and were followed for 1563 person-years (median, 1.1 years; maximum, 3.7 years). Because of low retention and logistic limitations, we concluded the study early and followed enrolled participants through an orderly study closure rather than expanding enrollment. The TDF-FTC group had higher rates of nausea (18.5% vs. 7.1%, P<0.001), vomiting (11.3% vs. 7.1%, P=0.008), and dizziness (15.1% vs. 11.0%, P=0.03) than the placebo group, but the rates of serious adverse events were similar (P=0.90). Participants who received TDF-FTC, as compared with those who received placebo, had a significant decline in bone mineral density. K65R, M184V, and A62V resistance mutations developed in 1 participant in the TDF-FTC group who had had an unrecognized acute HIV infection at enrollment. In a modified intention-to-treat analysis that included the 33 participants who became infected during the study (9 in the TDF-FTC group and 24 in the placebo group; 1.2 and 3.1 infections per 100 person-years, respectively), the efficacy of TDF-FTC was 62.2% (95% confidence interval, 21.5 to 83.4; P=0.03). Daily TDF-FTC prophylaxis prevented HIV infection in sexually active heterosexual adults. The long-term safety of daily TDF-FTC prophylaxis, including the effect on bone mineral density, remains unknown. (Funded by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the National Institutes of Health; TDF2 ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00448669.).
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                SAGE Open Med
                SAGE Open Med
                SMO
                spsmo
                SAGE Open Medicine
                SAGE Publications (Sage UK: London, England )
                2050-3121
                11 March 2019
                2019
                : 7
                Affiliations
                [1 ]Department of Public Health Sciences, University of North Carolina at Charlotte, Charlotte, NC, USA
                [2 ]School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, UK
                [3 ]Public Health Program, Stetson University, DeLand, FL, USA
                [4 ]Infectious Disease Management, Intervention, and Community Practice, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, USA
                [5 ]Disease Control and Health Protection, Florida Department of Health in Volusia County, Daytona Beach, FL, USA
                [6 ]Office of Planning and Performance Management, Florida Department of Health in Volusia County, Daytona Beach, FL, USA
                Author notes
                Laura H Gunn, Department of Public Health Sciences, University of North Carolina at Charlotte, 9201 University City Blvd, Charlotte, NC 28223, USA. Email: lgunn@ 123456uncc.edu
                Article
                10.1177_2050312119836030
                10.1177/2050312119836030
                6413419
                © The Author(s) 2019

                This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 License ( http://www.creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/) which permits non-commercial use, reproduction and distribution of the work without further permission provided the original work is attributed as specified on the SAGE and Open Access pages ( https://us.sagepub.com/en-us/nam/open-access-at-sage).

                Categories
                Original Article
                Custom metadata
                January-December 2019

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