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      Polysaccharides in colon-specific drug delivery

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      International Journal of Pharmaceutics
      Elsevier BV

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          Abstract

          Natural polysaccharides are now extensively used for the development of solid dosage forms for delivery of drug to the colon. The rationale for the development of a polysaccharide based delivery system for colon is the presence of large amounts of polysaccharidases in the human colon as the colon is inhabited by a large number and variety of bacteria which secrete many enzymes e.g. beta-D-glucosidase, beta-D-galactosidase, amylase, pectinase, xylanase, beta-D-xylosidase, dextranase, etc. Various major approaches utilizing polysaccharides for colon-specific delivery are fermentable coating of the drug core, embedding of the drug in biodegradable matrix, formulation of drug-saccharide conjugate (prodrugs). A large number of polysaccharides have already been studied for their potential as colon-specific drug carrier systems, such as chitosan, pectin, chondroitin sulphate, cyclodextrin, dextrans, guar gum, inulin, amylose and locust bean gum. Recent efforts and approaches exploiting these polysaccharides in colon-specific drug delivery are discussed.

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          Author and article information

          Journal
          International Journal of Pharmaceutics
          International Journal of Pharmaceutics
          Elsevier BV
          03785173
          August 2001
          August 2001
          : 224
          : 1-2
          : 19-38
          Article
          10.1016/S0378-5173(01)00720-7
          11472812
          d6ccdd89-b015-42ec-83e0-cbd32e4f8dcf
          © 2001

          https://www.elsevier.com/tdm/userlicense/1.0/

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