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      Perfluorinated chemicals in relation to other persistent organic pollutants in human blood.

      Chemosphere
      Adult, Chromatography, Liquid, Environmental Monitoring, Environmental Pollutants, blood, Female, Fluorocarbons, Humans, Male, Mass Spectrometry, Middle Aged, Sweden

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          Abstract

          In order to evaluate blood levels of some perfluorinated chemicals (PFCs) and compare them to current levels of classical persistent organic pollutants (POPs) whole blood samples from Sweden were analyzed with respect to 12 PFCs, 37 polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), p,p'-dichlorodiphenyl-dichloroethylene (DDE), hexachlorobenzene (HCB), six chlordanes and three polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs). The median concentration, on whole blood basis, of the sum of PFCs was 20-50 times higher compared to the sum of PCBs and p,p'-DDE, 300-450 times higher than HCB, sum of chlordanes and sum of PBDEs. Estimations of the total body amount of PFCs and lipophilic POPs point at similar body burdens. While levels of for example PCBs and PBDEs are normalized to the lipid content of blood, there is no such general procedure for PFCs in blood. The distributions of a number of perfluorinated compounds between whole blood and plasma were therefore studied. Plasma concentrations were higher than whole blood concentrations for four perfluoroalkylated acids with plasma/whole blood ratios between 1.1 and 1.4, whereas the ratio for perflurooctanesulfonamide (PFOSA) was considerably lower (0.2). This suggests that the comparison of levels of PFCs determined in plasma with levels determined in whole blood should be made with caution. We also conclude that Swedish residents are exposed to a large number of PFCs to the same extent as in USA, Japan, Colombia and the few other countries from which data is available today.

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          Author and article information

          Journal
          16403420
          10.1016/j.chemosphere.2005.11.040

          Chemistry
          Adult,Chromatography, Liquid,Environmental Monitoring,Environmental Pollutants,blood,Female,Fluorocarbons,Humans,Male,Mass Spectrometry,Middle Aged,Sweden

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