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Knowledge, attitudes, risk perception of influenza and influenza vaccination among final year nursing students in Singapore: an exploratory study

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Antimicrobial Resistance and Infection Control

BioMed Central

3rd International Conference on Prevention and Infection Control (ICPIC 2015)

16-19 June 2015

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      Nurses' knowledge and risk perception towards seasonal influenza and vaccination and their vaccination behaviours: a cross-sectional survey.

      Seasonal influenza has become a serious public health problem worldwide and vaccination is recognized as the most effective preventative measure. Healthcare workers can be the vectors of influenza outbreaks. Data suggest that nurses' vaccination remains suboptimal worldwide. To explore the relationship among nurses' knowledge, risk perception and their vaccination behaviours and the reasons for vaccination uptake. A cross-sectional survey. Participants were recruited from the nurses enrolled on continuing professional education courses at a large university in London. A sample of 522 nurses returned completed questionnaires (response rate 77.7%). Most of the respondents were women, worked in hospitals and had direct patient contact. The mean years qualified as a nurse were 11.9 ± 8.75 years. The survey instrument examined nurses' knowledge about influenza and vaccination, risk perception towards influenza and pandemics, vaccination behaviours and reasons for vaccination acceptance or refusal. The survey also collected data regarding gender, age, highest educational qualification, work place, clinical specialty, qualified years as a nurse, and whether they had direct patient contact. The influenza vaccination rate among the respondents was 36% with about 41% never vaccinated. Nurses with a high knowledge level were more likely to get vaccinated compared to those with a low knowledge level (p<0.001). Vaccination rates between the high risk perception and low risk perception groups were different (p=0.019). Sentinel knowledge items were associated with nurses' vaccination status. Several risk perception items including personal vulnerability to influenza or H1N1, mortality risk of H1N1, and the likelihood of transmitting influenza to patients were also predictors of vaccination uptake. Vaccinated nurses were more likely to recommend vaccination to their patients (p<0.001). The most frequent reason for vaccination refusal was concern about the side-effects of the vaccination while self-protection was the most frequent reason for vaccination uptake. This study confirmed a relationship between knowledge, risk perception and vaccination behaviours among nurses. The identified sentinel items of knowledge and risk perception could inform future vaccination campaigns. The clinical specialty of nurses and the importance of accessibility to vaccination as predictors of vaccine uptake require further exploration. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
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        Student nurses' reasons behind the decision to receive or decline influenza vaccine: a cross-sectional survey.

        This cross-sectional questionnaire survey examined influenza vaccination among 430 student nurses. Only 12.2% (95% CI 9.1-15.3%) of student nurses received the seasonal vaccine regularly with 27.6% (95% CI 23.3-31.8%) ever having received seasonal or pandemic H1N1 vaccine. Intention to be vaccinated was associated with having previously been vaccinated (p<0.001) but not whether the vaccine was perceived as beneficial (p=0.36). Previous influenza illness was associated with having the influenza vaccine (p<0.001). The most frequently reported reason for receiving the seasonal influenza vaccine was being deemed at risk (42.4%) and for H1N1 vaccine was because it was offered for free (32.6%). For both vaccines the most reported reason for not being vaccinated was a perception of it not being needed. Student nurses form a substantial and influential part of the future healthcare workforce but to translate the widely held acceptance that influenza vaccine is beneficial into actual uptake, a more targeted and persuasive message is needed. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
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          Author and article information

          Affiliations
          [1 ]Nursing, JurongHealth, Singapore
          Conference
          Antimicrob Resist Infect Control
          Antimicrob Resist Infect Control
          Antimicrobial Resistance and Infection Control
          BioMed Central
          2047-2994
          2015
          16 June 2015
          : 4
          : Suppl 1
          : P19
          4474685 2047-2994-4-S1-P19 10.1186/2047-2994-4-S1-P19
          Copyright © 2015 Leong; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

          This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License ( http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver ( http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated.

          3rd International Conference on Prevention and Infection Control (ICPIC 2015)
          Geneva, Switzerland
          16-19 June 2015
          Categories
          Poster Presentation

          Infectious disease & Microbiology

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