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      Robotic Art and Cultural Imagination

      1

      Politics of the Machines - Art and After (EVA Copenhagen)

      Digital arts and culture

      15 - 17 May 2018

      Robot, Robotic Art, Cultural imagination, Cultural robotics

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          Abstract

          In this article, I aim to accentuate the importance of the cultural imagination about robots, observing it ‘as a mixed register of fantasy and an actual practice’ (Kakoudaki 2007, 165). I emphasise the field of robotic art, which, I argue, is in a fluid state of exchange with other areas of robotic research, equally benefiting from the larger context of the cultural imagination about robots.

          Furthermore, I discuss artworks that offer a valuable commentary on robots even though they are not defined as robotic art in a narrow sense (Penny 2013), given that they feature only the representation of robots or robot-like characters. Nevertheless, these artworks contribute to the circulation of symbolic registers that revolve around the multifaceted figure of a robot.

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          Most cited references 31

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          WHO IS AFRAID OF THE HUMANOID? INVESTIGATING CULTURAL DIFFERENCES IN THE ACCEPTANCE OF ROBOTS

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            Welcome to the experience economy.

             B J Pine,  J H Gilmore (1998)
            First there was agriculture, then manufactured goods, and eventually services. Each change represented a step up in economic value--a way for producers to distinguish their products from increasingly undifferentiated competitive offerings. Now, as services are in their turn becoming commoditized, companies are looking for the next higher value in an economic offering. Leading-edge companies are finding that it lies in staging experiences. To reach this higher level of competition, companies will have to learn how to design, sell, and deliver experiences that customers will readily pay for. An experience occurs when a company uses services as the stage--and goods as props--for engaging individuals in a way that creates a memorable event. And while experiences have always been at the heart of the entertainment business, any company stages an experience when it engages customers in a personal, memorable way. The lessons of pioneering experience providers, including the Walt Disney Company, can help companies learn how to compete in the experience economy. The authors offer five design principles that drive the creation of memorable experiences. First, create a consistent theme, one that resonates throughout the entire experience. Second, layer the theme with positive cues--for example, easy-to-follow signs. Third, eliminate negative cues, those visual or aural messages that distract or contradict the theme. Fourth, offer memorabilia that commemorate the experience for the user. Finally, engage all five senses--through sights, sounds, and so on--to heighten the experience and thus make it more memorable.
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              Humans, Animals, and Robots: A Phenomenological Approach to Human-Robot Relations

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                Author and article information

                Contributors
                Conference
                May 2018
                May 2018
                : 1-10
                Affiliations
                [1 ] School of Arts and Communication

                Nordenskiöldsgatan 1, 211 19 Malmö, Sweden
                Article
                10.14236/ewic/EVAC18.48
                © Romic. Published by BCS Learning and Development Ltd. Proceedings of EVA Copenhagen 2018, Denmark

                This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 Unported License. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

                Politics of the Machines - Art and After
                EVA Copenhagen
                7
                Aalborg University, Copenhagen, Denmark
                15 - 17 May 2018
                Electronic Workshops in Computing (eWiC)
                Digital arts and culture
                Product
                Product Information: 1477-9358BCS Learning & Development
                Self URI (journal page): https://ewic.bcs.org/
                Categories
                Electronic Workshops in Computing

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