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      Rehabilitation by limb activation training reduces left-sided motor impairment in unilateral neglect patients: A single-blind randomised control trial

      , , , ,

      Neuropsychological Rehabilitation

      Informa UK Limited

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          Most cited references 22

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          An extended activities of daily living scale for stroke patients

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            Assessing motor impairment after stroke: a pilot reliability study.

             C Collin,  D Wade (1990)
            Two short tests of motor function, the Motricity Index (MI) and the Trunk Control Test (TCT), were assessed at regular intervals after stroke and compared with a detailed physiotherapy test, the Rivermead Motor Assessment (RMA). The MI and TCT were valid and reliable tests which were usually quicker to perform than the RMA. The TCT was of predictive value when related to eventual walking ability. All three tests appeared to be of equal sensitivity in detecting change.
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              Rehabilitation of brain damage: brain plasticity and principles of guided recovery.

              Rehabilitation of the damaged brain can foster reconnection of damaged neural circuits; Hebbian learning mechanisms play an important part in this. The authors propose a triage of post-lesion states, depending on the loss of connectivity in particular circuits. A small loss of connectivity will tend to lead to autonomous recovery, whereas a major loss of connectivity will lead to permanent loss of function; for such individuals, a compensatory approach to recovery is required. The third group have potentially rescuable lesioned circuits, but guided recovery depends on providing precisely targeted bottom-up and top-down inputs, maintaining adequate levels of arousal, and avoiding activation of competitor circuits that may suppress activity in target circuits. Empirical data are implemented in a neural network model, and clinical recommendations for the practice of rehabilitation following brain damage are made.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Neuropsychological Rehabilitation
                Neuropsychological Rehabilitation
                Informa UK Limited
                0960-2011
                1464-0694
                November 2002
                November 2002
                : 12
                : 5
                : 439-454
                Article
                10.1080/09602010244000228
                © 2002

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