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      Myeloablative Versus Reduced-Intensity Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation for Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Myelodysplastic Syndromes

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          Abstract

          <div class="section"> <a class="named-anchor" id="d14834416e252"> <!-- named anchor --> </a> <h5 class="section-title" id="d14834416e253">Purpose</h5> <p id="d14834416e255">The optimal regimen intensity before allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) is unknown. We hypothesized that lower treatment-related mortality (TRM) with reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC) would result in improved overall survival (OS) compared with myeloablative conditioning (MAC). To test this hypothesis, we performed a phase III randomized trial comparing MAC with RIC in patients with acute myeloid leukemia or myelodysplastic syndromes. </p> </div><div class="section"> <a class="named-anchor" id="d14834416e257"> <!-- named anchor --> </a> <h5 class="section-title" id="d14834416e258">Patients and Methods</h5> <p id="d14834416e260">Patients age 18 to 65 years with HCT comorbidity index ≤ 4 and &lt; 5% marrow myeloblasts pre-HCT were randomly assigned to receive MAC (n = 135) or RIC (n = 137) followed by HCT from HLA-matched related or unrelated donors. The primary end point was OS 18 months post–random assignment based on an intent-to-treat analysis. Secondary end points included relapse-free survival (RFS) and TRM. </p> </div><div class="section"> <a class="named-anchor" id="d14834416e262"> <!-- named anchor --> </a> <h5 class="section-title" id="d14834416e263">Results</h5> <p id="d14834416e265">Planned enrollment was 356 patients; accrual ceased at 272 because of high relapse incidence with RIC versus MAC (48.3%; 95% CI, 39.6% to 56.4% and 13.5%; 95% CI, 8.3% to 19.8%, respectively; <i>P</i> &lt; .001). At 18 months, OS for patients in the RIC arm was 67.7% (95% CI, 59.1% to 74.9%) versus 77.5% (95% CI, 69.4% to 83.7%) for those in the MAC arm (difference, 9.8%; 95% CI, −0.8% to 20.3%; <i>P</i> = .07). TRM with RIC was 4.4% (95% CI, 1.8% to 8.9%) versus 15.8% (95% CI, 10.2% to 22.5%) with MAC ( <i>P</i> = .002). RFS with RIC was 47.3% (95% CI, 38.7% to 55.4%) versus 67.8% (95% CI, 59.1% to 75%) with MAC ( <i>P</i> &lt; .01). </p> </div><div class="section"> <a class="named-anchor" id="d14834416e279"> <!-- named anchor --> </a> <h5 class="section-title" id="d14834416e280">Conclusion</h5> <p id="d14834416e282">OS was higher with MAC, but this was not statistically significant. RIC resulted in lower TRM but higher relapse rates compared with MAC, with a statistically significant advantage in RFS with MAC. These data support the use of MAC as the standard of care for fit patients with acute myeloid leukemia or myelodysplastic syndromes. </p> </div>

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          Most cited references 25

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          Clinical application and proposal for modification of the International Working Group (IWG) response criteria in myelodysplasia.

          The myelodysplastic syndromes (MDSs) are heterogeneous with respect to clinical characteristics, pathologic features, and cytogenetic abnormalities. This heterogeneity is a challenge for evaluating response to treatment. Therapeutic trials in MDS have used various criteria to assess results, making cross-study comparisons problematic. In 2000, an International Working Group (IWG) proposed standardized response criteria for evaluating clinically significant responses in MDS. These criteria included measures of alteration in the natural history of disease, hematologic improvement, cytogenetic response, and improvement in health-related quality of life. The relevance of the response criteria has now been validated prospectively in MDS clinical trials, and they have gained acceptance in research studies and in clinical practice. Because limitations of the IWG criteria have surfaced, based on practical and reported experience, some modifications were warranted. In this report, we present recommendations for revisions of some of the initial criteria.
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            Hematopoietic cell transplantation in older patients with hematologic malignancies: replacing high-dose cytotoxic therapy with graft-versus-tumor effects.

            Toxicities have limited the use of allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) to younger, medically fit patients. In a canine HCT model, a combination of postgrafting mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) and cyclosporine (CSP) allowed stable allogeneic engraftment after minimally toxic conditioning with low-dose (200 cGy) total-body irradiation (TBI). These findings, together with the known antitumor effects of donor leukocyte infusions (DLIs), led to the design of this trial. Forty-five patients (median age 56 years) with hematologic malignancies, HLA-identical sibling donors, and relative contraindications to conventional HCT were treated. Immunosuppression involved TBI of 200 cGy before and CSP/MMF after HCT. DLIs were given after HCT for persistent malignancy, mixed chimerism, or both. Regimen toxicities and myelosuppression were mild, allowing 53% of eligible patients to have entirely outpatient transplantations. Nonfatal graft rejection occurred in 20% of patients. Grades II to III acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) occurred in 47% of patients with sustained engraftment. With median follow-up of 417 days, survival was 66.7%, nonrelapse mortality 6.7%, and relapse mortality 26.7%. Fifty-three percent of patients with sustained engraftment were in complete remission, including 8 with molecular remissions. This novel allografting approach, based on the use of postgrafting immunosuppression to control graft rejection and GVHD, has dramatically reduced the acute toxicities of allografting. HCT with the induction of potent graft-versus-tumor effects can be performed in previously ineligible patients, largely in an outpatient setting. Future protocol modifications should reduce rejection and GVHD, thereby facilitating studies of allogeneic immunotherapy for a variety of malignancies. (Blood. 2001;97:3390-3400)
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              Comparative outcome of reduced intensity and myeloablative conditioning regimen in HLA identical sibling allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation for patients older than 50 years of age with acute myeloblastic leukaemia: a retrospective survey from the Acute Leukemia Working Party (ALWP) of the European group for Blood and Marrow Transplantation (EBMT).

               M Falda,  J Boiron,  H Shouten (2005)
              Results of reduced intensity conditioning regimen (RIC) in the HLA identical haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) setting have not been compared to those after myeloablative (MA) regimen HSCT in patients with acute myeloblastic leukaemia (AML) over 50 years of age. With this aim, outcomes of 315 RIC were compared with 407 MA HSCT recipients. The majority of RIC was fludarabine-based regimen associated to busulphan (BU) (53%) or low-dose total body irradiation (24%). Multivariate analyses of outcomes were used adjusting for differences between both groups. The median follow-up was 13 months. Cytogenetics, FAB classification, WBC count at diagnosis and status of the disease at transplant were not statistically different between the two groups. However, RIC patients were older, transplanted more recently, and more frequently with peripheral blood allogeneic stem cells as compared to MA recipients. In multivariate analysis, acute GVHD (II-IV) and transplant-related mortality were significantly decreased (P=0.01 and P<10(-4), respectively) and relapse incidence was significantly higher (P=0.003) after RIC transplantation. Leukaemia-free survival was not statistically different between the two groups. These results may set the grounds for prospective trials comparing RIC with other strategies of treatment in elderly AML.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Journal of Clinical Oncology
                JCO
                American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO)
                0732-183X
                1527-7755
                April 10 2017
                April 10 2017
                : 35
                : 11
                : 1154-1161
                Article
                10.1200/JCO.2016.70.7091
                5455603
                28380315
                © 2017
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