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      Reovirus infection triggers inflammatory responses to dietary antigens and development of celiac disease

      , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

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      American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS)

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          Most cited references 46

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          The IRF family transcription factors in immunity and oncogenesis.

          The interferon regulatory factor (IRF) family, consisting of nine members in mammals, was identified in the late 1980s in the context of research into the type I interferon system. Subsequent studies over the past two decades have revealed the versatile and critical functions performed by this transcription factor family. Indeed, many IRF members play central roles in the cellular differentiation of hematopoietic cells and in the regulation of gene expression in response to pathogen-derived danger signals. In particular, the advances made in understanding the immunobiology of Toll-like and other pattern-recognition receptors have recently generated new momentum for the study of IRFs. Moreover, the role of several IRF family members in the regulation of the cell cycle and apoptosis has important implications for understanding susceptibility to and progression of several cancers.
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            Identification of a molecular signaling network that regulates a cellular necrotic cell death pathway.

            Stimulation of death receptors by agonists such as FasL and TNFalpha activates apoptotic cell death in apoptotic-competent conditions or a type of necrotic cell death dependent on RIP1 kinase, termed necroptosis, in apoptotic-deficient conditions. In a genome-wide siRNA screen for regulators of necroptosis, we identify a set of 432 genes that regulate necroptosis, a subset of 32 genes that act downstream and/or as regulators of RIP1 kinase, 32 genes required for death-receptor-mediated apoptosis, and 7 genes involved in both necroptosis and apoptosis. We show that the expression of subsets of the 432 genes is enriched in the immune and nervous systems, and cellular sensitivity to necroptosis is regulated by an extensive signaling network mediating innate immunity. Interestingly, Bmf, a BH3-only Bcl-2 family member, is required for death-receptor-induced necroptosis. Our study defines a cellular signaling network that regulates necroptosis and the molecular bifurcation that controls apoptosis and necroptosis.
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              The virome in mammalian physiology and disease.

              The virome contains the most abundant and fastest mutating genetic elements on Earth. The mammalian virome is constituted of viruses that infect host cells, virus-derived elements in our chromosomes, and viruses that infect the broad array of other types of organisms that inhabit us. Virome interactions with the host cannot be encompassed by a monotheistic view of viruses as pathogens. Instead, the genetic and transcriptional identity of mammals is defined in part by our coevolved virome, a concept with profound implications for understanding health and disease. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Science
                Science
                American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS)
                0036-8075
                1095-9203
                April 06 2017
                April 06 2017
                : 356
                : 6333
                : 44-50
                Article
                10.1126/science.aah5298
                5506690
                28386004
                © 2017

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