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      Real-time PCR for mRNA quantitation

      1 , 1

      BioTechniques

      Future Science Ltd

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          Abstract

          Real-time PCR has become one of the most widely used methods of gene quantitation because it has a large dynamic range, boasts tremendous sensitivity, can be highly sequence-specific, has little to no post-amplification processing, and is amenable to increasing sample throughput. However, optimal benefit from these advantages requires a clear understanding of the many options available for running a real-time PCR experiment. Starting with the theory behind real-time PCR, this review discusses the key components of a real-time PCR experiment, including one-step or two-step PCR, absolute versus relative quantitation, mathematical models available for relative quantitation and amplification efficiency calculations, types of normalization or data correction, and detection chemistries. In addition, the many causes of variation as well as methods to calculate intra- and inter-assay variation are addressed.

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          Most cited references 61

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          Analysis of relative gene expression data using real-time quantitative PCR and the 2(-Delta Delta C(T)) Method.

          The two most commonly used methods to analyze data from real-time, quantitative PCR experiments are absolute quantification and relative quantification. Absolute quantification determines the input copy number, usually by relating the PCR signal to a standard curve. Relative quantification relates the PCR signal of the target transcript in a treatment group to that of another sample such as an untreated control. The 2(-Delta Delta C(T)) method is a convenient way to analyze the relative changes in gene expression from real-time quantitative PCR experiments. The purpose of this report is to present the derivation, assumptions, and applications of the 2(-Delta Delta C(T)) method. In addition, we present the derivation and applications of two variations of the 2(-Delta Delta C(T)) method that may be useful in the analysis of real-time, quantitative PCR data. Copyright 2001 Elsevier Science (USA).
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            A new mathematical model for relative quantification in real-time RT-PCR.

             M. Pfaffl (2001)
            Use of the real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to amplify cDNA products reverse transcribed from mRNA is on the way to becoming a routine tool in molecular biology to study low abundance gene expression. Real-time PCR is easy to perform, provides the necessary accuracy and produces reliable as well as rapid quantification results. But accurate quantification of nucleic acids requires a reproducible methodology and an adequate mathematical model for data analysis. This study enters into the particular topics of the relative quantification in real-time RT-PCR of a target gene transcript in comparison to a reference gene transcript. Therefore, a new mathematical model is presented. The relative expression ratio is calculated only from the real-time PCR efficiencies and the crossing point deviation of an unknown sample versus a control. This model needs no calibration curve. Control levels were included in the model to standardise each reaction run with respect to RNA integrity, sample loading and inter-PCR variations. High accuracy and reproducibility (<2.5% variation) were reached in LightCycler PCR using the established mathematical model.
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              Molecular beacons: probes that fluoresce upon hybridization.

              We have developed novel nucleic acid probes that recognize and report the presence of specific nucleic acids in homogeneous solutions. These probes undergo a spontaneous fluorogenic conformational change when they hybridize to their targets. Only perfectly complementary targets elicit this response, as hybridization does not occur when the target contains a mismatched nucleotide or a deletion. The probes are particularly suited for monitoring the synthesis of specific nucleic acids in real time. When used in nucleic acid amplification assays, gene detection is homogeneous and sensitive, and can be carried out in a sealed tube. When introduced into living cells, these probes should enable the origin, movement, and fate of specific mRNAs to be traced.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                BioTechniques
                BioTechniques
                Future Science Ltd
                0736-6205
                1940-9818
                July 2005
                July 2005
                : 39
                : 1
                : 75-85
                Affiliations
                [1 ]University of California, Davis, CA, USA
                Article
                10.2144/05391RV01
                16060372
                © 2005
                Product

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