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      Assess Connect Transform In Our Neighborhood: A framework for engaging community partners in community-based participatory research designs

      1 , 1

      Action Research

      SAGE Publications

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          Abstract

          Community-based participatory research calls for high levels of community involvement and shared power between community partners and researchers. Though a body of literature exists on the process and outcomes of community-engaged research, to date this literature has primarily been limited to a reporting of individual case studies. The purpose of this paper is to introduce an overarching framework for engaging community members in decision-making action and practices surrounding the community-based participatory research design process. The Assess Connect Transform In Our Neighborhood framework is built on the principle of shared expertise, as researchers and community partners bring with them unique skills, experiences, and competencies that are vital to balancing scientific rigor and community authenticity in community-engaged research. As more researchers understand the “how” of engaging communities in the research design process, research teams may face fewer obstacles to launching research that is realistic, legitimate, and rigorous, leading to actionable community change.

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          Most cited references 23

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          Community-based participatory research contributions to intervention research: the intersection of science and practice to improve health equity.

          Community-based participatory research (CBPR) has emerged in the last decades as a transformative research paradigm that bridges the gap between science and practice through community engagement and social action to increase health equity. CBPR expands the potential for the translational sciences to develop, implement, and disseminate effective interventions across diverse communities through strategies to redress power imbalances; facilitate mutual benefit among community and academic partners; and promote reciprocal knowledge translation, incorporating community theories into the research. We identify the barriers and challenges within the intervention and implementation sciences, discuss how CBPR can address these challenges, provide an illustrative research example, and discuss next steps to advance the translational science of CBPR.
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            Community-based research partnerships: challenges and opportunities.

            The complexity of many urban health problems often makes them ill suited to traditional research approaches and interventions. The resultant frustration, together with community calls for genuine partnership in the research process, has highlighted the importance of an alternative paradigm. Community-based participatory research (CBPR) is presented as a promising collaborative approach that combines systematic inquiry, participation, and action to address urban health problems. Following a brief review of its basic tenets and historical roots, key ways in which CBPR adds value to urban health research are introduced and illustrated. Case study examples from diverse international settings are used to illustrate some of the difficult ethical challenges that may arise in the course of CBPR partnership approaches. The concepts of partnership synergy and cultural humility, together with protocols such as Green et al.'s guidelines for appraising CBPR projects, are highlighted as useful tools for urban health researchers seeking to apply this collaborative approach and to deal effectively with the difficult ethical challenges it can present.
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              Community-based participatory research as a tool to advance environmental health sciences.

              The past two decades have witnessed a rapid proliferation of community-based participatory research (CBPR) projects. CBPR methodology presents an alternative to traditional population-based biomedical research practices by encouraging active and equal partnerships between community members and academic investigators. The National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS), the premier biomedical research facility for environmental health, is a leader in promoting the use of CBPR in instances where community-university partnerships serve to advance our understanding of environmentally related disease. In this article, the authors highlight six key principles of CBPR and describe how these principles are met within specific NIEHS-supported research investigations. These projects demonstrate that community-based participatory research can be an effective tool to enhance our knowledge of the causes and mechanisms of disorders having an environmental etiology, reduce adverse health outcomes through innovative intervention strategies and policy change, and address the environmental health concerns of community residents.
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                Author and article information

                Contributors
                (View ORCID Profile)
                Journal
                Action Research
                Action Research
                SAGE Publications
                1476-7503
                1741-2617
                June 2021
                August 02 2018
                June 2021
                : 19
                : 2
                : 372-392
                Affiliations
                [1 ]Arizona State University, USA
                Article
                10.1177/1476750318789484
                © 2021

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