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      Sperm quantity and quality effects on fertilization success in a highly promiscuous passerine, the tree swallow Tachycineta bicolor

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          Unrepeatable Repeatabilities: A Common Mistake

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            SPERM COMPETITION AND ITS EVOLUTIONARY CONSEQUENCES IN THE INSECTS

             G. A. Parker (1970)
            Biological Reviews, 45(4), 525-567
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              Postcopulatory sexual selection.

              The female reproductive tract is where competition between the sperm of different males takes place, aided and abetted by the female herself. Intense postcopulatory sexual selection fosters inter-sexual conflict and drives rapid evolutionary change to generate a startling diversity of morphological, behavioural and physiological adaptations. We identify three main issues that should be resolved to advance our understanding of postcopulatory sexual selection. We need to determine the genetic basis of different male fertility traits and female traits that mediate sperm selection; identify the genes or genomic regions that control these traits; and establish the coevolutionary trajectory of sexes.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology
                Behav Ecol Sociobiol
                Springer Nature
                0340-5443
                1432-0762
                September 2010
                April 2010
                : 64
                : 9
                : 1473-1483
                Article
                10.1007/s00265-010-0962-8
                © 2010
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