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The neural correlates of maternal and romantic love.

Neuroimage

Social Perception, Reward, physiology, Receptors, Neurotransmitter, Object Attachment, Nervous System Physiological Phenomena, Middle Aged, Maternal Behavior, Love, Infant, Image Processing, Computer-Assisted, Humans, Female, Face, Data Interpretation, Statistical, Child, Preschool, Child, Brain Mapping, Brain Chemistry, Brain, Adult, Adolescent

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      Abstract

      Romantic and maternal love are highly rewarding experiences. Both are linked to the perpetuation of the species and therefore have a closely linked biological function of crucial evolutionary importance. Yet almost nothing is known about their neural correlates in the human. We therefore used fMRI to measure brain activity in mothers while they viewed pictures of their own and of acquainted children, and of their best friend and of acquainted adults as additional controls. The activity specific to maternal attachment was compared to that associated to romantic love described in our earlier study and to the distribution of attachment-mediating neurohormones established by other studies. Both types of attachment activated regions specific to each, as well as overlapping regions in the brain's reward system that coincide with areas rich in oxytocin and vasopressin receptors. Both deactivated a common set of regions associated with negative emotions, social judgment and 'mentalizing', that is, the assessment of other people's intentions and emotions. We conclude that human attachment employs a push-pull mechanism that overcomes social distance by deactivating networks used for critical social assessment and negative emotions, while it bonds individuals through the involvement of the reward circuitry, explaining the power of love to motivate and exhilarate.

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      Journal
      10.1016/j.neuroimage.2003.11.003
      15006682
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