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      Nanomedicine formulations for the delivery of antiviral drugs: a promising solution for the treatment of viral infections

      1 , 1 , 1 , 2 , 2

      Expert Opinion on Drug Delivery

      Informa UK Limited

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          Abstract

          Viral infections represent a public health problem and one of the leading causes of global mortality. Nanomedicine strategies can be considered a powerful tool to enhance the effectiveness of antiviral drugs, often associated with solubility and bioavailability issues. Consequently, high doses and frequent administrations are required, resulting in adverse side effects. To overcome these limitations, various nanomedicine platforms have been designed.

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          Most cited references 150

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          Insight into nanoparticle cellular uptake and intracellular targeting.

          Collaborative efforts from the fields of biology, materials science, and engineering are leading to exciting progress in the development of nanomedicines. Since the targets of many therapeutic agents are localized in subcellular compartments, modulation of nanoparticle-cell interactions for efficient cellular uptake through the plasma membrane and the development of nanomedicines for precise delivery to subcellular compartments remain formidable challenges. Cellular internalization routes determine the post-internalization fate and intracellular localization of nanoparticles. This review highlights the cellular uptake routes most relevant to the field of non-targeted nanomedicine and presents an account of ligand-targeted nanoparticles for receptor-mediated cellular internalization as a strategy for modulating the cellular uptake of nanoparticles. Ligand-targeted nanoparticles have been the main impetus behind the progress of nanomedicines towards the clinic. This strategy has already resulted in remarkable progress towards effective oral delivery of nanomedicines that can overcome the intestinal epithelial barrier. A detailed overview of the recent developments in subcellular targeting as a novel platform for next-generation organelle-specific nanomedicines is also provided. Each section of the review includes prospects, potential, and concrete expectations from the field of targeted nanomedicines and strategies to meet those expectations.
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            Polymeric micelle stability

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              Nanotechnology in therapeutics: a focus on nanoparticles as a drug delivery system.

              Continuing improvement in the pharmacological and therapeutic properties of drugs is driving the revolution in novel drug delivery systems. In fact, a wide spectrum of therapeutic nanocarriers has been extensively investigated to address this emerging need. Accordingly, this article will review recent developments in the use of nanoparticles as drug delivery systems to treat a wide variety of diseases. Finally, we will introduce challenges and future nanotechnology strategies to overcome limitations in this field.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Expert Opinion on Drug Delivery
                Expert Opinion on Drug Delivery
                Informa UK Limited
                1742-5247
                1744-7593
                March 20 2017
                August 03 2017
                January 02 2018
                : 15
                : 1
                : 93-114
                Affiliations
                [1 ] Department of Clinical and Biological Sciences, University of Torino, S. Luigi Gonzaga Hospital, Torino, Italy
                [2 ] Department of Drug Science and Technology, University of Torino, Turin, Italy
                Article
                10.1080/17425247.2017.1360863
                28749739
                d972a25f-f77e-4c0d-83a0-2f99de38eac4
                © 2018

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