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      Knowledge-hiding behaviors and employees’ silence: mediating role of psychological contract breach

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      Journal of Knowledge Management
      Emerald

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          Abstract

          Purpose

          The purpose of this study is to examine the relationship between knowledge-hiding behaviors (evasive hiding, playing dumb and rationalized hiding) and employees’ silence (defensive silence, relational silence and ineffectual silence). Besides, this paper investigates the relation mediated by psychological contract breach.

          Design/methodology/approach

          The data were collected with three-time lags (40 days each) through a structured questionnaire from 389 employees of registered software houses in Pakistan. The structural equation modeling (partial least squares) approach is used for data analysis.

          Findings

          The findings of this study confirm that knowledge-hiding behaviors have a significant and positive relationship with employees’ silence, and psychological contract breach significantly mediates the relationship between knowledge-hiding behaviors and employees’ silence.

          Practical implications

          The implications of this study are very supportive to the knowledge-intensive organizations, i.e. software houses. The management should increase the knowledge sharing and trust culture among employees to discourage the knowledge-hiding behaviors among employees. Moreover, supervisors should develop trust among employees, motivate them to avoid knowledge hiding and encourage the employees to raise their voices against their problems in a formal way.

          Originality/value

          The present study highlights the impact of different dimensions of knowledge hiding on employees’ silence and the role of psychological contract breach as a mediator in this scenario.

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          Most cited references68

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          Evaluating Structural Equation Models with Unobservable Variables and Measurement Error

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            Conservation of resources: A new attempt at conceptualizing stress.

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              Intrinsic and Extrinsic Motivations: Classic Definitions and New Directions.

              Intrinsic and extrinsic types of motivation have been widely studied, and the distinction between them has shed important light on both developmental and educational practices. In this review we revisit the classic definitions of intrinsic and extrinsic motivation in light of contemporary research and theory. Intrinsic motivation remains an important construct, reflecting the natural human propensity to learn and assimilate. However, extrinsic motivation is argued to vary considerably in its relative autonomy and thus can either reflect external control or true self-regulation. The relations of both classes of motives to basic human needs for autonomy, competence and relatedness are discussed. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Journal of Knowledge Management
                JKM
                Emerald
                1367-3270
                1367-3270
                August 20 2020
                November 17 2020
                August 20 2020
                November 17 2020
                : 24
                : 9
                : 2171-2194
                Article
                10.1108/JKM-02-2020-0149
                d97f8672-66cf-4bfb-bdd3-e917d810d742
                © 2020

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