11
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: not found

      Neural correlates of mentalizing-related computations during strategic interactions in humans.

      Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America

      Adult, Brain, physiology, Female, Humans, Learning, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Male, Mental Processes, Models, Psychological, Neurons, Reinforcement (Psychology), Reward, Social Behavior, Task Performance and Analysis

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisherPMC
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          Competing successfully against an intelligent adversary requires the ability to mentalize an opponent's state of mind to anticipate his/her future behavior. Although much is known about what brain regions are activated during mentalizing, the question of how this function is implemented has received little attention to date. Here we formulated a computational model describing the capacity to mentalize in games. We scanned human subjects with functional MRI while they participated in a simple two-player strategy game and correlated our model against the functional MRI data. Different model components captured activity in distinct parts of the mentalizing network. While medial prefrontal cortex tracked an individual's expectations given the degree of model-predicted influence, posterior superior temporal sulcus was found to correspond to an influence update signal, capturing the difference between expected and actual influence exerted. These results suggest dissociable contributions of different parts of the mentalizing network to the computations underlying higher-order strategizing in humans.

          Related collections

          Author and article information

          Journal
          18427116
          2373314
          10.1073/pnas.0711099105

          Comments

          Comment on this article