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      Prospects for improving biological control of olive fruit fly,Bactrocera oleae(Diptera: Tephritidae), with introduced parasitoids (Hymenoptera)

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      Biocontrol Science and Technology
      Informa UK Limited

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          Olive fruit fly: managing an ancient pest in modern times.

          Olive fruit fly, Bactrocera oleae (Rossi) (Diptera: Tephritidae), is the major pest of commercial olives worldwide. Various aspects of its biology, ecology, management, and impact on olive production are highlighted. With the discovery of insecticidal resistance in some populations frequently treated with organophosphates, old and new control options are being investigated. The potential of biological control is examined. Surveys suggest that a small group of braconids in the Opiinae subfamily best represent the primary parasitoids attacking olive fruit fly in its native range. These species include Psyttalia lounsburyi, P. dacicida, P. concolor, P. ponerophaga, and Utetes africanus. Bracon celer, another braconid but in the Braconinae subfamily, is also reared from the fruit fly in its native range. The potential of these and other natural enemies is discussed with respect to olive fruit fly biology, commercial olive production, and biological constraints that may limit their success. We suggest that numerous species exist that should be further investigated as control agents for olive fruit fly in the many climatic regimes where the pest is found.
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            A Revision of Olea L. (Oleaceae)

            P Green (2002)
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              Population structure and colonization history of the olive fly, Bactrocera oleae (Diptera, Tephritidae).

              The olive fly, Bactrocera oleae, is the major pest of olives in most commercial olive-growing regions worldwide. The species is abundant in the Mediterranean basin and has been introduced recently into California and Mexico, creating problems for quarantine protection and international trade. Here, we use nuclear microsatellite markers and mitochondrial sequences to examine the history of olive fly range expansion and colonization. Sampled populations span the current distribution of the olive fly worldwide, including South and Central Africa, Pakistan, Mediterranean Europe and Middle East, California, and Mexico. The Pakistani populations appear to be genetically well differentiated from the remaining populations, though rooting the origins of the species is problematic. Genetic similarity and assignment tests cluster the remaining populations into two genetic groups--Africa and a group including the Mediterranean basin and the American region. That Africa, and not the Mediterranean, is the origin of flies infesting cultivated olive is supported by the significantly greater genetic diversity at microsatellite loci in Africa relative to the Mediterranean area. The results also indicate that the recent invasion of olive flies in the American region most likely originated from the Mediterranean area.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Biocontrol Science and Technology
                Biocontrol Science and Technology
                Informa UK Limited
                0958-3157
                1360-0478
                September 2011
                September 2011
                : 21
                : 9
                : 1005-1025
                Article
                10.1080/09583157.2011.594951
                d9f5a4ff-f083-4a87-8594-ba5d83995cd4
                © 2011
                History

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