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      Perceptions of relationship satisfaction and addictive behavior: Comparing pornography and marijuana use

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          Abstract

          Background and aims

          Research indicates that excessive pornography use can negatively impact romantic relationships. However, it is unclear whether these negative outcomes are different than negative outcomes produced by other compulsive or addictive behaviors, such as drug use. This study compared perceptions of relationship outcomes from either a romantic partner's excessive marijuana or pornography use. Furthermore, this study experimentally manipulated four factors potentially related to perceptions of relationship satisfaction and addictive behavior.

          Methods

          A total of 186 college-aged women read 16 scenarios describing heterosexual romantic relationships in which one partner used either pornography or marijuana. Each scenario varied on four variables: relationship commitment, secrecy of partner's behavior, frequency of partner's behavior, and context of partner's behavior.

          Results

          Results suggest that partner pornography and marijuana use are perceived to impact romantic relationships similarly and are influenced by similar factors, such as greater frequency, higher secrecy, and partner's availability for interaction.

          Conclusions

          Such findings are consistent with recommendations by professionals that compulsive pornography use be considered worthy of treatment intervention.

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          Most cited references 38

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          Hypersexual disorder: a proposed diagnosis for DSM-V.

           M Kafka (2010)
          Hypersexual Disorder is proposed as a new psychiatric disorder for consideration in the Sexual Disorders section for DSM-V. Historical precedents describing hypersexual behaviors as well as the antecedent representations and proposals for inclusion of such a condition in the previous DSM manuals are reviewed. Epidemiological as well as clinical evidence is presented suggesting that non-paraphilic "excesses" of sexual behavior (i.e., hypersexual behaviors and disorders) can be accompanied by both clinically significant personal distress and social and medical morbidity. The research literature describing comorbid Axis I and Axis II psychiatric disorders and a purported relationship between Axis I disorders and Hypersexual Disorder is discussed. Based on an extensive review of the literature, Hypersexual Disorder is conceptualized as primarily a nonparaphilic sexual desire disorder with an impulsivity component. Specific polythetic diagnostic criteria, as well as behavioral specifiers, are proposed, intended to integrate empirically based contributions from various putative pathophysiological perspectives, including dysregulation of sexual arousal and desire, sexual impulsivity, sexual addiction, and sexual compulsivity.
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            Generation XXX: Pornography Acceptance and Use Among Emerging Adults

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              The Relationship Between Depression and Internet Addiction

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                Author and article information

                Journal
                2006
                122266
                Journal of Behavioral Addictions
                JBA
                Akadémiai Kiadó, co-published with Springer Science+Business Media B.V., Formerly Kluwer Academic Publishers B.V.
                2062-5871
                2063-5303
                1 December 2012
                25 September 2012
                : 1
                : 4
                : 171-179
                Affiliations
                [ 1 ] University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR, USA
                [ 2 ] Department of Psychology, University of Arkansas, 216 Memorial Hall, Fayetteville, AR, 72701, USA
                Author notes
                [* ] +1-479-575-5818, +1-479-575-3219, abridges@ 123456uark.edu
                Article
                4
                10.1556/jba.1.2012.007
                © 2012 The Author(s)

                Open Access statement. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License ( https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium for non-commercial purposes, provided the original author and source are credited, a link to the CC License is provided, and changes – if any – are indicated.

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                Self URI (journal page): https://akademiai.com/loi/2006
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