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      Effects of singing classes on pulmonary function and quality of life of COPD patients

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          Abstract

          This study aimed to investigate the effects of weekly singings classes on pulmonary function parameters and quality of life (QoL) of COPD patients. Forty-three patients were randomized to weekly classes of singing practice, or handcraft work. They performed spirometry and completed maximal respiratory pressure measurements, evaluations of dyspnea, and the Saint George’s Respiratory Questionnaire, before and after 24 training classes. A functional evaluation, immediately after 10 minutes of singing practice, was also performed at the end of the study. Fifteen subjects completed the study in each group. In comparison to controls the singing group exhibited transitory elevations on the dyspnea Borg scale (p = 0.02), and inspiratory capacity (p = 0.01), and decreases of expiratory reserve volume (p = 0.03), just after a short session of singing. There was a significant difference on changes of maximal expiratory pressures in the comparison between groups at the end of training. While the control group showed deterioration of maximal expiratory pressure, the singing group exhibited a small improvement (p = 0.05). Both groups showed significant improvements of QoL in within group comparisons. We have concluded that singing classes are a well tolerated activity for selected subjects with COPD. Regular practice of singing may improve QoL, and preserve the maximal expiratory pressure of these patients.

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          Most cited references 21

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          Reference spirometric values using techniques and equipment that meet ATS recommendations.

          Forced expiratory volumes and flows were measured in 251 healthy nonsmoking men and women using techniques and equipment that meet American Thoracic Society (ATS) recommendations. Linear regression equations using height and age alone predict spirometric parameters as well as more complex equations using additional variables. Single values for 95% confidence intervals are acceptable and should replace the commonly used method of subtracting 20% to determine the lower limit of normal for a predicted value. Our study produced predicted values for forced vital capacity and forced expiratory volume in one second that were almost identical to those predicted by Morris and associates (1) when the data from their study were modified to be compatible with the back extrapolation technique recommended by the ATS. The study of Morris and colleagues was performed at sea level in rural subjects, whereas ours was performed at an altitude of 1,400 m in urban subjects. Either the present study or the study of Morris and co-workers, modified to back extrapolation, could be recommended for predicting normal values.
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            Reference values for lung function tests. II. Maximal respiratory pressures and voluntary ventilation.

            The strength of the respiratory muscles can be evaluated from static measurements (maximal inspiratory and expiratory pressures, MIP and MEP) or inferred from dynamic maneuvers (maximal voluntary ventilation, MVV). Although these data could be suitable for a number of clinical and research applications, no previous studies have provided reference values for such tests using a healthy, randomly selected sample of the adult Brazilian population. With this main purpose, we prospectively evaluated 100 non-smoking subjects (50 males and 50 females), 20 to 80 years old, selected from more than 8,000 individuals. Gender-specific linear prediction equations for MIP, MEP and MVV were developed by multiple regression analysis: age and, secondarily, anthropometric measurements explained up to 56% of the variability of the dependent variables. The most cited previous studies using either Caucasian or non-Caucasian samples systematically underestimated the observed values of MIP (P < 0.05). Interestingly, the self-reported level of regular physical activity and maximum aerobic power correlates strongly with both respiratory and peripheral muscular strength (knee extensor peak torque) (P < 0.01). Our results, therefore, provide a new frame of reference to evaluate the normalcy of some useful indexes of respiratory muscle strength in Brazilian males and females aged 20 to 80.
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              Maximal respiratory pressures: normal values and relationship to age and sex.

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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Int J Chron Obstruct Pulmon Dis
                International Journal of COPD
                International Journal of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease
                Dove Medical Press
                1176-9106
                1178-2005
                2009
                2009
                15 April 2009
                : 4
                : 1-8
                Affiliations
                [1 ] Internal Medicine Department, Medical School of Ribeirão Preto, University of São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, São Paulo, Brazil
                [2 ] Music Department, School of Arts and Communications, University of São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, São Paulo, Brazil Trial registered at ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT 00500526
                Author notes
                Correspondence: José Antônio Baddini Martinez, Internal Medicine Department, Avenida Bandeirantes 3900, CEP: 14048-800, Ribeirão Preto, São Paulo, Brazil, Tel +55 16 36022531, Fax +1 55 16 36336695, Email jabmarti@ 123456fmrp.usp.br
                Article
                copd-4-001
                2672787
                19436683
                © 2009 Bonilha et al, publisher and licensee Dove Medical Press Ltd.

                This is an Open Access article which permits unrestricted noncommercial use, provided the original work is properly cited.

                Categories
                Original Research

                Respiratory medicine

                copd, pulmonary function tests, breathing exercises

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