5
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
1 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: found
      Is Open Access

      Effect of ultrasound-guided peripheral nerve blocks of the abdominal wall on pain relief after laparoscopic cholecystectomy

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisherPMC
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          Purpose: The aim of this study was to compare the effect of an ultrasound-guided transversus abdominis plane block (TAPB) and rectus sheath block (RSB) combination, an ultrasound-guided posterior TAP block combined with the local anesthetic infiltration (LAI) and LAI alone on pain relief after laparoscopic cholecystectomy (LC).

          Patients and methods: One hundred eighty patients who were American Society of Anesthesiologists class Ι or Π were included in this randomized, double-blind, non-inferiority study. All patients underwent three-port LC and were divided into 3 groups. The LAI group had ropivacaine mixed with dexmedetomidine injected around the trocar entrance site preoperatively. The TL group underwent ultrasound-guided posterior TAPB combined with LAI, and the TR group underwent ultrasound-guided TAPB combined with RSB. Postoperative pain was evaluated at the first, 4th, 8th, 24th, and 48th hours. If the visual analogue scale (VAS) score (including incisional pain, visceral pain or shoulder pain) was >3, intravenous dezocine (0.05 mg/kg) was injected slowly. Sleep quality, total consumption of dezocine and time to unassisted walking were recorded. The Global Satisfaction Score (GSS) for analgesia was also assessed within 48 hrs.

          Results: No difference was found in sleep quality, time to unassisted walking, or requirement for dezocine. We also found no difference in VAS scores at each time point within 48 hrs after LC among the 3 groups, but the GSS for analgesia in the LAI group was significantly increased within 48 hrs compared with the other two groups.

          Conclusion: Ultrasound-guided peripheral nerve blocks of the abdominal wall can significantly relieve postoperative pain in patients undergoing LC; however, patients receiving LAI expressed more satisfaction than patients in whom other methods were used. LAI is an easy and effective method that can be recommended for routine clinical practice in LC patients who are not converted to an open procedure.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 33

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          Opioid-induced hyperalgesia in patients after surgery: a systematic review and a meta-analysis.

          Opioids can increase sensitivity to noxious stimuli and cause opioid-induced hyperalgesia. We performed a systematic review to evaluate the clinical consequences of intra-operative doses of opioid. We identified randomized controlled trials which compared intra-operative opioid to lower doses or placebo in adult patients undergoing surgery from MEDLINE, EMBASE, LILAC, Cochrane, and hand searches of trial registries. We pooled data of postoperative pain intensity, morphine consumption, incidence of opioid-related side-effects, primary and secondary hyperalgesia. For dichotomous outcomes relative risks [95% confidence intervals (CIs)] and for continuous outcomes mean differences (MDs) or standardized mean difference (SMD; 95% CI) were calculated. Twenty-seven studies involving 1494 patients were included in the analysis. Patients treated with high intra-operative doses of opioid reported higher postoperative pain intensity than the reference groups (MD: 9.4 cm; 95% CI: 4.4, 14.5) at 1 h, (MD: 7.1 cm; 95% CI: 2.8, 11.3) at 4 h, and (MD: 3 cm; 95% CI: 0.4, 5.6) at 24 h on a 100 cm visual analogue scale. They also showed higher postoperative morphine use after 24 h (SMD: 0.7; 95% CI: 0.37, 1.02). There was no difference in the incidences of nausea, vomiting, and drowsiness. These results were mainly associated with the use of remifentanil. The impact of other opioids is less clear because of limited data. This review suggests that high intra-operative doses of remifentanil are associated with small but significant increases in acute pain after surgery. © The Author [2014]. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Journal of Anaesthesia. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: not found

            Ultrasound-guided transversus abdominis plane block: description of a new technique and comparison with conventional systemic analgesia during laparoscopic cholecystectomy.

            The transversus abdominis plane (TAP) block is usually performed by landmark-based methods. This prospective, randomized, and double-blinded study was designed to describe a method of ultrasound-guided TAP block and to evaluate the intra- and postoperative analgesic efficacy in patients undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy under general anaesthesia with or without TAP block. Forty-two patients undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy were randomized to receive standard general anaesthetic either with (Group A, n=21) or without TAP block (Group B, n=21). Ultrasound-guided bilateral TAP block was performed with a high frequent linear ultrasound probe and an in-plane needle guidance technique with 15 ml bupivacaine 5 mg ml(-1) on each side. Intraoperative use of sufentanil and postoperative demand of morphine using a patient-controlled analgesia device were recorded. Ultrasonographic visualization of the relevant anatomy, detection of the shaft and tip of the needle, and the spread of local anaesthetic were possible in all cases where a TAP block was performed. Patients in Group A received significantly less [corrected] intraoperative sufentanil and postoperative morphine compared with those in Group B [mean (SD) 8.6 (3.5) vs 23.0 (4.8) microg, P<0.01, and 10.5 (7.7) vs 22.8 (4.3) mg, P<0.05]. Ultrasonographic guidance enables exact placement of the local anaesthetic for TAP blocks. In patients undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy under standard general anaesthetic, ultrasound-guided TAP block substantially reduced the perioperative opioid consumption.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: not found

              Perineural dexmedetomidine added to ropivacaine for sciatic nerve block in rats prolongs the duration of analgesia by blocking the hyperpolarization-activated cation current.

              The current study was designed to test the hypothesis that the increased duration of analgesia caused by adding dexmedetomidine to local anesthetic results from blockade of the hyperpolarization-activated cation (I(h)) current. In this randomized, blinded, controlled study, the analgesic effects of peripheral nerve blocks using 0.5% ropivacaine alone or 0.5% ropivacaine plus dexmedetomidine (34 μM or 6 μg/kg) were assessed with or without the pretreatment of α(1)- and α(2)-adrenoceptor antagonists (prazosin and idazoxan, respectively) and antagonists and agonists of the I(h) current (ZD 7288 and forskolin, respectively). Sciatic nerve blocks were performed, and analgesia was measured by paw withdrawal latency to a thermal stimulus every 30 min for 300 min postblock. The analgesic effect of dexmedetomidine added to ropivacaine was not reversed by either prazosin or idazoxan. There were no additive or attenuated effects from the pretreatment with ZD 7288 (I(h) current blocker) compared with dexmedetomidine added to ropivacaine. When forskolin was administered as a pretreatment to ropivacaine plus dexmedetomidine, there were statistically significant reductions in duration of analgesia at time points 90-180 min (P < 0.0001 for each individual comparison). The duration of blockade for the forskolin (768 μM) followed by ropivacaine plus dexmedetomidine group mirrored the pattern of the ropivacaine alone group, thereby implying a reversal effect. Dexmedetomidine added to ropivacaine caused approximately a 75% increase in the duration of analgesia, which was reversed by pretreatment with an I(h) current enhancer. The analgesic effect of dexmedetomidine was not reversed by an α(2)-adrenoceptor antagonist.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                J Pain Res
                J Pain Res
                JPR
                jpainres
                Journal of Pain Research
                Dove
                1178-7090
                03 May 2019
                2019
                : 12
                : 1433-1439
                Affiliations
                [1 ]Department of Anesthesiology, The First People’s Hospital of Hefei, Anhui Medical University , Hefei 230061, People’s Republic of China
                [2 ]Department of Anesthesiology, Anhui Provincial People‘s Armed Police General Hospital , Hefei 230041, People’s Republic of China
                Author notes
                Correspondence: Junma YuDepartment of Anesthesiology, The First People’s Hospital of Hefei, Anhui Medical University , Huaihe Road 390, Hefei230061, People’s Republic of ChinaTel +865 516 218 3386Email majuny163@ 123456163.com
                Article
                203721
                10.2147/JPR.S203721
                6506571
                © 2019 Wu et al.

                This work is published and licensed by Dove Medical Press Limited. The full terms of this license are available at https://www.dovepress.com/terms.php and incorporate the Creative Commons Attribution – Non Commercial (unported, v3.0) License ( http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/). By accessing the work you hereby accept the Terms. Non-commercial uses of the work are permitted without any further permission from Dove Medical Press Limited, provided the work is properly attributed. For permission for commercial use of this work, please see paragraphs 4.2 and 5 of our Terms ( https://www.dovepress.com/terms.php).

                Page count
                Figures: 3, Tables: 1, References: 33, Pages: 7
                Categories
                Original Research

                Comments

                Comment on this article