4
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: found
      Is Open Access

      Reproductive healthcare in prison: A qualitative study of women’s experiences and perspectives in Ontario, Canada

      Read this article at

      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          Objective

          To explore women’s experiences and perspectives of reproductive healthcare in prison.

          Methods

          We conducted a qualitative study using semi-structured focus groups in 2018 with women in a provincial prison in Ontario, Canada. We asked participants about their experiences and perspectives of pregnancy and contraception related to healthcare in prison. We used a combination of deductive and inductive content analysis to categorize data. A concept map was generated using a reproductive justice framework.

          Results

          The data reflected three components of a reproductive justice framework: 1) women have limited access to healthcare in prison, 2) reproductive safety and dignity influence attitudes toward pregnancy and contraception, and 3) women in prison want better reproductive healthcare. Discrimination and stigma were commonly invoked throughout women’s experiences in seeking reproductive healthcare.

          Conclusions

          Improving reproductive healthcare for women in prison is crucial to promoting reproductive justice in this population. Efforts to increase access to comprehensive, responsive, and timely reproductive healthcare should be informed by the needs and desires of women in prison and should actively seek to reduce their experience of discrimination and stigma in this context.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 43

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          The qualitative content analysis process.

          This paper is a description of inductive and deductive content analysis. Content analysis is a method that may be used with either qualitative or quantitative data and in an inductive or deductive way. Qualitative content analysis is commonly used in nursing studies but little has been published on the analysis process and many research books generally only provide a short description of this method. When using content analysis, the aim was to build a model to describe the phenomenon in a conceptual form. Both inductive and deductive analysis processes are represented as three main phases: preparation, organizing and reporting. The preparation phase is similar in both approaches. The concepts are derived from the data in inductive content analysis. Deductive content analysis is used when the structure of analysis is operationalized on the basis of previous knowledge. Inductive content analysis is used in cases where there are no previous studies dealing with the phenomenon or when it is fragmented. A deductive approach is useful if the general aim was to test a previous theory in a different situation or to compare categories at different time periods.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: found
            Is Open Access

            Saturation in qualitative research: exploring its conceptualization and operationalization

            Saturation has attained widespread acceptance as a methodological principle in qualitative research. It is commonly taken to indicate that, on the basis of the data that have been collected or analysed hitherto, further data collection and/or analysis are unnecessary. However, there appears to be uncertainty as to how saturation should be conceptualized, and inconsistencies in its use. In this paper, we look to clarify the nature, purposes and uses of saturation, and in doing so add to theoretical debate on the role of saturation across different methodologies. We identify four distinct approaches to saturation, which differ in terms of the extent to which an inductive or a deductive logic is adopted, and the relative emphasis on data collection, data analysis, and theorizing. We explore the purposes saturation might serve in relation to these different approaches, and the implications for how and when saturation will be sought. In examining these issues, we highlight the uncertain logic underlying saturation—as essentially a predictive statement about the unobserved based on the observed, a judgement that, we argue, results in equivocation, and may in part explain the confusion surrounding its use. We conclude that saturation should be operationalized in a way that is consistent with the research question(s), and the theoretical position and analytic framework adopted, but also that there should be some limit to its scope, so as not to risk saturation losing its coherence and potency if its conceptualization and uses are stretched too widely.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: not found

              Content analysis and thematic analysis: Implications for conducting a qualitative descriptive study.

              Qualitative content analysis and thematic analysis are two commonly used approaches in data analysis of nursing research, but boundaries between the two have not been clearly specified. In other words, they are being used interchangeably and it seems difficult for the researcher to choose between them. In this respect, this paper describes and discusses the boundaries between qualitative content analysis and thematic analysis and presents implications to improve the consistency between the purpose of related studies and the method of data analyses. This is a discussion paper, comprising an analytical overview and discussion of the definitions, aims, philosophical background, data gathering, and analysis of content analysis and thematic analysis, and addressing their methodological subtleties. It is concluded that in spite of many similarities between the approaches, including cutting across data and searching for patterns and themes, their main difference lies in the opportunity for quantification of data. It means that measuring the frequency of different categories and themes is possible in content analysis with caution as a proxy for significance. © 2013 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Contributors
                Role: ConceptualizationRole: Formal analysisRole: Funding acquisitionRole: InvestigationRole: MethodologyRole: Project administrationRole: Writing – original draft
                Role: Formal analysisRole: InvestigationRole: MethodologyRole: Writing – review & editing
                Role: InvestigationRole: MethodologyRole: Writing – review & editing
                Role: Formal analysisRole: Writing – review & editing
                Role: Formal analysisRole: Writing – review & editing
                Role: Formal analysisRole: Writing – review & editing
                Role: ConceptualizationRole: MethodologyRole: Writing – review & editing
                Role: ConceptualizationRole: MethodologyRole: Writing – review & editing
                Role: ConceptualizationRole: Formal analysisRole: Funding acquisitionRole: InvestigationRole: MethodologyRole: Project administrationRole: SupervisionRole: Writing – review & editing
                Role: Editor
                Journal
                PLoS One
                PLoS One
                plos
                plosone
                PLoS ONE
                Public Library of Science (San Francisco, CA USA )
                1932-6203
                18 May 2021
                2021
                : 16
                : 5
                Affiliations
                [1 ] Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada
                [2 ] Department of Indigenous Learning, Lakehead University, Ontario, Canada
                [3 ] Department of Women’s Studies, Lakehead University, Ontario, Canada
                [4 ] School of Health Studies, University of Western Ontario, Ontario, Canada
                [5 ] Faculty of Health Sciences, School of Medicine, McMaster University, Ontario, Canada
                [6 ] School of Nursing, McMaster University, Ontario, Canada
                [7 ] Independent Researcher, Ontario, Canada
                [8 ] Department of Family Medicine, McMaster University, Ontario, Canada
                University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, UNITED STATES
                Author notes

                Competing Interests: The authors have declared that no competing interests exist. One author (LP) is currently employed by a public health unit but did not participate in this study in this capacity, and this does not alter our adherence to PLOS ONE policies on sharing data and materials.

                ‡ These authors also contributed equally to this work.

                Article
                PONE-D-20-34245
                10.1371/journal.pone.0251853
                8130921
                34003876
                © 2021 Liauw et al

                This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

                Page count
                Figures: 1, Tables: 0, Pages: 15
                Product
                Funding
                Funded by: funder-id http://dx.doi.org/10.13039/501100004258, Regional Medical Associates of Hamilton;
                Award ID: Research Scholarship Fund
                Award Recipient :
                This work was funded by an award (JL) from the Regional Medical Associates Research Scholarship Fund, in Hamilton, Ontario. The funders had no role in study design, data collection and analysis, decision to publish, or preparation of the manuscript. One author (LP) is currently employed by a public health unit but did not participate in this project in this role, so we did not list this organization as their affiliation. This author was not paid to do any of the work involved in this project by any employer (past or present) nor did they receive any of the project’s funding in return for their services.
                Categories
                Research Article
                Social Sciences
                Law and Legal Sciences
                Criminal Justice System
                Prisons
                Medicine and Health Sciences
                Women's Health
                Maternal Health
                Pregnancy
                Medicine and Health Sciences
                Women's Health
                Obstetrics and Gynecology
                Pregnancy
                Medicine and Health Sciences
                Women's Health
                Obstetrics and Gynecology
                Contraception
                Female Contraception
                Medicine and Health Sciences
                Health Care
                Health Care Providers
                Allied Health Care Professionals
                Medicine and Health Sciences
                Health Care
                Health Care Providers
                Physicians
                People and Places
                Population Groupings
                Professions
                Medical Personnel
                Physicians
                Medicine and Health Sciences
                Women's Health
                Obstetrics and Gynecology
                Contraception
                People and Places
                Population Groupings
                Professions
                Medical Personnel
                Nurses
                Medicine and Health Sciences
                Health Care
                Health Care Providers
                Nurses
                Research and Analysis Methods
                Research Design
                Qualitative Studies
                Custom metadata
                All relevant data are within the manuscript and its Supporting Information files.

                Uncategorized

                Comments

                Comment on this article