106
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
1 collections
    1
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: found
      Is Open Access

      ANCAassociated vasculitis in a man with scleroderma and pulmonary fibrosis

      , ,
      Canadian Journal of General Internal Medicine
      Dougmar Publishing Group, Inc.

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisher
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          Systemic sclerosis, or scleroderma, is a connective tissue disease that causes fibrosis of the skin and potentially internal organs (1). The most common lung findings in those with scleroderma are interstitial lung disease and pulmonary hypertension (1). Here we describe a 58-year-old man with scleroderma, interstitial lung disease and pulmonary arterial hypertension. He presented with atypical pulmonary manifestations and an acute kidney injury caused by a new diagnosis of ANCA-associated vasculitis. 

          Related collections

          Most cited references6

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          Interstitial lung disease and ANCA-associated vasculitis: a retrospective observational cohort study.

          ANCA-associated vasculitis and interstitial lung disease (ILD) are uncommon conditions. The occurrence of both diseases in the same patient is increasingly recognized. Our aim was to ascertain the characteristics and outcomes of patients with ILD and ANCA-associated vasculitis. A retrospective observational cohort study was performed. Patients who presented to the Hammersmith Hospital, London, with ANCA-associated vasculitis [granulomatosis with polyangiitis (Wegener's), microscopic polyangiitis (MPA) or Churg-Strauss syndrome] who also had ILD were included. Following hospital discharge, all patients were followed up in a multi-disciplinary vasculitis clinic. We recorded patient demographics, diagnostic tests, treatment, complications and mortality. ILD was observed in 2.7% (n = 14) of our patients with ANCA-associated vasculitis (n = 510); all had MPO-ANCA and a clinical diagnosis of MPA, giving a prevalence of 7.2% in patients with MPA (n = 194). There was no significant difference in survival between patients with MPA and ILD and those with MPA alone. It is important that physicians are aware of this clinical association and the presence of ILD should be considered in all patients with ANCA-associated vasculitis, especially those with MPO-ANCA. The possibility that patients with ILD may subsequently develop features of systemic vasculitis should also be remembered.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: not found

            Imaging of pulmonary vasculitis.

            The presence of pulmonary vasculitis can be suggested by a clinical presentation that includes diffuse pulmonary hemorrhage, acute glomerulonephritis, chronic refractory sinusitis or rhinorrhea, imaging findings of nodules or cavities, mononeuritis multiplex, multisystemic disease, and palpable purpura. Serologic tests, including the use of cytoplasmic antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA) and perinuclear ANCA, are performed for the differential diagnosis of the diseases. A positive cytoplasmic ANCA test result is specific enough to make a diagnosis of ANCA-associated granulomatous vasculitis if the clinical features are typical. Perinuclear ANCA positivity raises the possibility of Churg-Strauss syndrome or microscopic polyangiitis. Imaging findings of pulmonary vasculitis are diverse and often poorly specific. The use of a pattern-based approach to the imaging findings may help narrow the differential diagnosis of various pulmonary vasculitides. Integration of clinical, laboratory, and imaging findings is mandatory for making a reasonably specific diagnosis.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: found

              Revisiting ANCA-associated vasculitis in systemic sclerosis: clinical, serological and immunogenetic factors.

              To define the clinical, serological, histological and immunogenetic features of patients with scleroderma and ANCA-associated vasculitis (AAV). We examined a clinical database of 2,200 patients with either limited or diffuse cutaneous systemic sclerosis (SSc). Patients with a confirmed diagnosis of vasculitis who were ANCA positive with either MPO or PR3 reactivity had their clinical features, serology, histology and HLA haplotypes examined in detail. From this SSc cohort, 35 patients (1.6%) had evidence of vasculitis, and the SSc autoantibody profiles in this group were comparable to those previously published from the whole cohort. Of these 35 patients, 8 (0.4% of whole SSc cohort) had either anti-MPO or anti-PR3 antibodies and two further patients were ANCA positive without defined specificities. Of the eight ANCA-positive patients, seven had limited cutaneous SSc and anti-MPO antibodies and only one had anti-PR3 antibodies, associated with diffuse cutaneous SSc. Two ANCA-positive patients had anti-U3RNP antibodies, usually associated with overlap disease. None of the patients had granulomatous disease. The majority had glomerulonephritis, renal arteritis and pulmonary fibrosis. There were several shared HLA haplotypes from the DP and DQ loci in these overlap patients. SSc in overlap with ANCA-associated vasculitis is rare, and clinical features are more mixed than when either of these two conditions occurs separately. From our database, U3RNP antibodies may be more associated with overlap AAV than the other scleroderma-specific antibodies.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                Canadian Journal of General Internal Medicine
                Can Journ Gen Int Med
                Dougmar Publishing Group, Inc.
                2369-1778
                1911-1606
                August 27 2018
                August 27 2018
                : 13
                : 3
                : 21-24
                Article
                10.22374/cjgim.v13i3.164
                da9ed225-7fd9-4c4c-9c30-b01d576b916b
                © 2018

                Copyright of articles published in all DPG titles is retained by the author. The author grants DPG the rights to publish the article and identify itself as the original publisher. The author grants DPG exclusive commercial rights to the article. The author grants any non-commercial third party the rights to use the article freely provided original author(s) and citation details are cited. To view a copy of this license, visit https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/


                General medicine,Geriatric medicine,Neurology,Internal medicine
                General medicine, Geriatric medicine, Neurology, Internal medicine

                Comments

                Comment on this article