Blog
About

47
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    8
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: found
      Is Open Access

      A potential prognostic long non-coding RNA signature to predict metastasis-free survival of breast cancer patients

      Read this article at

      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) have been implicated in a variety of biological processes, and dysregulated lncRNAs have demonstrated potential roles as biomarkers and therapeutic targets for cancer prognosis and treatment. In this study, by repurposing microarray probes, we analyzed lncRNA expression profiles of 916 breast cancer patients from the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO). Nine lncRNAs were identified to be significantly associated with metastasis-free survival (MFS) in the training dataset of 254 patients using the Cox proportional hazards regression model. These nine lncRNAs were then combined to form a single prognostic signature for predicting metastatic risk in breast cancer patients that was able to classify patients in the training dataset into high- and low-risk subgroups with significantly different MFSs (median 2.4 years versus 3.0 years, log-rank test p < 0.001). This nine-lncRNA signature was similarly effective for prognosis in a testing dataset and two independent datasets. Further analysis showed that the predictive ability of the signature was independent of clinical variables, including age, ER status, ESR1 status and ERBB2 status. Our results indicated that lncRNA signature could be a useful prognostic marker to predict metastatic risk in breast cancer patients and may improve upon our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying breast cancer metastasis.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 41

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: found
          Is Open Access

          Bioinformatics enrichment tools: paths toward the comprehensive functional analysis of large gene lists

          Functional analysis of large gene lists, derived in most cases from emerging high-throughput genomic, proteomic and bioinformatics scanning approaches, is still a challenging and daunting task. The gene-annotation enrichment analysis is a promising high-throughput strategy that increases the likelihood for investigators to identify biological processes most pertinent to their study. Approximately 68 bioinformatics enrichment tools that are currently available in the community are collected in this survey. Tools are uniquely categorized into three major classes, according to their underlying enrichment algorithms. The comprehensive collections, unique tool classifications and associated questions/issues will provide a more comprehensive and up-to-date view regarding the advantages, pitfalls and recent trends in a simpler tool-class level rather than by a tool-by-tool approach. Thus, the survey will help tool designers/developers and experienced end users understand the underlying algorithms and pertinent details of particular tool categories/tools, enabling them to make the best choices for their particular research interests.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: not found

            Exploration, normalization, and summaries of high density oligonucleotide array probe level data.

            In this paper we report exploratory analyses of high-density oligonucleotide array data from the Affymetrix GeneChip system with the objective of improving upon currently used measures of gene expression. Our analyses make use of three data sets: a small experimental study consisting of five MGU74A mouse GeneChip arrays, part of the data from an extensive spike-in study conducted by Gene Logic and Wyeth's Genetics Institute involving 95 HG-U95A human GeneChip arrays; and part of a dilution study conducted by Gene Logic involving 75 HG-U95A GeneChip arrays. We display some familiar features of the perfect match and mismatch probe (PM and MM) values of these data, and examine the variance-mean relationship with probe-level data from probes believed to be defective, and so delivering noise only. We explain why we need to normalize the arrays to one another using probe level intensities. We then examine the behavior of the PM and MM using spike-in data and assess three commonly used summary measures: Affymetrix's (i) average difference (AvDiff) and (ii) MAS 5.0 signal, and (iii) the Li and Wong multiplicative model-based expression index (MBEI). The exploratory data analyses of the probe level data motivate a new summary measure that is a robust multi-array average (RMA) of background-adjusted, normalized, and log-transformed PM values. We evaluate the four expression summary measures using the dilution study data, assessing their behavior in terms of bias, variance and (for MBEI and RMA) model fit. Finally, we evaluate the algorithms in terms of their ability to detect known levels of differential expression using the spike-in data. We conclude that there is no obvious downside to using RMA and attaching a standard error (SE) to this quantity using a linear model which removes probe-specific affinities.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: not found
              Is Open Access

              Comprehensive molecular portraits of human breast tumors

              Summary We analyzed primary breast cancers by genomic DNA copy number arrays, DNA methylation, exome sequencing, mRNA arrays, microRNA sequencing and reverse phase protein arrays. Our ability to integrate information across platforms provided key insights into previously-defined gene expression subtypes and demonstrated the existence of four main breast cancer classes when combining data from five platforms, each of which shows significant molecular heterogeneity. Somatic mutations in only three genes (TP53, PIK3CA and GATA3) occurred at > 10% incidence across all breast cancers; however, there were numerous subtype-associated and novel gene mutations including the enrichment of specific mutations in GATA3, PIK3CA and MAP3K1 with the Luminal A subtype. We identified two novel protein expression-defined subgroups, possibly contributed by stromal/microenvironmental elements, and integrated analyses identified specific signaling pathways dominant in each molecular subtype including a HER2/p-HER2/HER1/p-HER1 signature within the HER2-Enriched expression subtype. Comparison of Basal-like breast tumors with high-grade Serous Ovarian tumors showed many molecular commonalities, suggesting a related etiology and similar therapeutic opportunities. The biologic finding of the four main breast cancer subtypes caused by different subsets of genetic and epigenetic abnormalities raises the hypothesis that much of the clinically observable plasticity and heterogeneity occurs within, and not across, these major biologic subtypes of breast cancer.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Affiliations
                [1 ]College of Bioinformatics Science and Technology, Harbin Medical University , Harbin 150081, PR China
                [2 ]Department of General Surgery, The Fourth Affiliated Hospital, Harbin medical university , Harbin 150081, China
                Author notes
                [*]

                These authors contributed equally to this work.

                Journal
                Sci Rep
                Sci Rep
                Scientific Reports
                Nature Publishing Group
                2045-2322
                09 November 2015
                2015
                : 5
                srep16553
                10.1038/srep16553
                4637883
                26549855
                Copyright © 2015, Macmillan Publishers Limited

                This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in the credit line; if the material is not included under the Creative Commons license, users will need to obtain permission from the license holder to reproduce the material. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

                Categories
                Article

                Uncategorized

                Comments

                Comment on this article