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      Patterns and problems of deliberate self-poisoning in the developing world.

      QJM: An International Journal of Medicine

      epidemiology, Self-Injurious Behavior, prevention & control, Poisoning, poisoning, Pesticides, Middle Aged, Medicine, Traditional, Male, Infant, Humans, Fuel Oils, Female, Drug-Related Side Effects and Adverse Reactions, statistics & numerical data, Developing Countries, Detergents, Child, Preschool, Child, Caustics, Attitude of Health Personnel, supply & distribution, Antidotes, Agrochemicals, Aged, Adult, Adolescent

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          Abstract

          Deliberate self-harm is a major problem in the developing world, responsible for around 600 000 deaths in 1990. The toxicity of available poisons and paucity of medical services ensure that mortality from self-poisoning is far greater in the tropics than in the industrialized world. Few data are available on the poisons most commonly used for self-harm in different parts of the world. This paper reviews the literature on poisoning, to identify the important poisons used for self-harm in these regions. Pesticides are the most important poison throughout the tropics, being both common and associated with a high mortality rate. In some regions, particular pesticides have become the most popular method of self-harm, gaining a notoriety amongst both health-care workers and public. Self-poisoning with medicines such as benzodiazepines and antidepressants is common in urban areas, but associated with few deaths. The antimalarial chloroquine appears the most significant medicine, self-poisoning being common in both Africa and the Pacific region, and often fatal. Paracetamol (acetaminophen) is used in many countries but in few has it reached the popularity typical of the UK. Domestic and industrial chemicals are responsible for significant numbers of deaths and long-term disabilities world-wide. Self-poisoning with plant parts, although uncommon globally, is locally popular in some regions. Few of these poisons have specific antidotes. This emphasizes the importance of determining whether interventions aimed at reducing poison absorption actually produce a clinical benefit, reducing death and complication rates. Future research to improve medical management and find effective ways of reducing the incidence of self-harm, together with more widespread provision of interventions proven to be effective, could rapidly reduce the number of deaths from self-poisoning in the developing world.

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          11077028

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