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      SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling enzymes are associated with cardiac hypertrophy in a genetic rat model of hypertension.

      1 , ,
      Journal of cellular physiology
      Wiley

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          Abstract

          Pathological cardiac hypertrophy is characterized by a sustained increase in cardiomyocyte size and re-activation of the fetal cardiac gene program. Previous studies implicated SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling enzymes as regulators of the fetal cardiac gene program in surgical models of cardiac hypertrophy. Although hypertension is a common risk factor for developing cardiac hypertrophy, there has not yet been any investigation into the role of SWI/SNF enzymes in cardiac hypertrophy using genetic models of hypertension. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that components of the SWI/SNF complex are activated and recruited to promoters that regulate the fetal cardiac gene program in hearts that become hypertrophic as a result of salt induced hypertension. Utilizing the Dahl salt-sensitive (S) rat model, we found that the protein levels of several SWI/SNF subunits required for heart development, Brg1, Baf180, and Baf60c, are elevated in hypertrophic hearts from S rats fed a high salt diet compared with normotensive hearts from Dahl salt-resistant (R) rats fed the same diet. Furthermore, we detected significantly higher levels of SWI/SNF subunit enrichment as well as evidence of more accessible chromatin structure on two fetal cardiac gene promoters in hearts from S rats compared with R rats. Our data implicate SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling enzymes as regulators of gene expression in cardiac hypertrophy resulting from salt induced hypertension. Thus we provide novel insights into the epigenetic mechanisms by which salt induced hypertension leads to cardiac hypertrophy.

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          Author and article information

          Journal
          J. Cell. Physiol.
          Journal of cellular physiology
          Wiley
          1097-4652
          0021-9541
          Dec 2013
          : 228
          : 12
          Affiliations
          [1 ] Department of Biochemistry and Cancer Biology, University of Toledo College of Medicine and Life Sciences, Toledo, OH.
          Article
          NIHMS584763
          10.1002/jcp.24404
          4040522
          23702776
          db29a6ec-13a4-4efd-8230-de0d3e0e5c3e
          History

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