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      Lignocellulosic biomass: a sustainable platform for the production of bio-based chemicals and polymers

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          Abstract

          The ongoing research activities in the field of lignocellulosic biomass for production of value-added chemicals and polymers that can be utilized to replace petroleum-based materials are reviewed.

          Abstract

          The demand for petroleum dependent chemicals and materials has been increasing despite the dwindling of their fossil resources. As the dead-end of petroleum based industry has started to appear, today's modern society has to implement alternative energy and valuable chemical resources immediately. Owing to the importance of lignocellulosic biomass being the most abundant and bio-renewable biomass on earth, this critical review provides insights into the potential of lignocellulosic biomass as an alternative platform to fossil resources. In this context, over 200 value-added compounds, which can be derived from lignocellulosic biomass by various treatment methods, are presented with their references. Lignocellulosic biomass based polymers and their commercial importance are also reported mainly in the frame of these compounds. This review article aims to draw the map of lignocellulosic biomass derived chemicals and their synthetic polymers, and to reveal the scope of this map in today's modern chemical and polymer industry.

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          Synthesis of transportation fuels from biomass: chemistry, catalysts, and engineering.

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            Technology development for the production of biobased products from biorefinery carbohydrates—the US Department of Energy’s “Top 10” revisited

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              Features of promising technologies for pretreatment of lignocellulosic biomass.

              N. Mosier (2005)
              Cellulosic plant material represents an as-of-yet untapped source of fermentable sugars for significant industrial use. Many physio-chemical structural and compositional factors hinder the enzymatic digestibility of cellulose present in lignocellulosic biomass. The goal of any pretreatment technology is to alter or remove structural and compositional impediments to hydrolysis in order to improve the rate of enzyme hydrolysis and increase yields of fermentable sugars from cellulose or hemicellulose. These methods cause physical and/or chemical changes in the plant biomass in order to achieve this result. Experimental investigation of physical changes and chemical reactions that occur during pretreatment is required for the development of effective and mechanistic models that can be used for the rational design of pretreatment processes. Furthermore, pretreatment processing conditions must be tailored to the specific chemical and structural composition of the various, and variable, sources of lignocellulosic biomass. This paper reviews process parameters and their fundamental modes of action for promising pretreatment methods.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                PCOHC2
                Polymer Chemistry
                Polym. Chem.
                Royal Society of Chemistry (RSC)
                1759-9954
                1759-9962
                2015
                2015
                : 6
                : 25
                : 4497-4559
                Affiliations
                [1 ]Department of Chemistry
                [2 ]Boğaziçi University
                [3 ]Bebek
                [4 ]Turkey
                [5 ]School of Engineering and Materials Science
                [6 ]Queen Mary University of London
                [7 ]E1 4NS London
                [8 ]UK
                Article
                10.1039/C5PY00263J
                db304bcb-2686-47f0-8706-5ebb020be9dd
                © 2015
                History

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